Textbook Notes (368,448)
Canada (161,886)
HLTC22H3 (102)
Chapter 2

PSYC12 – Chapter 2 Notes Inzlicht Textbook.docx

4 Pages
118 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Health Studies
Course
HLTC22H3
Professor
Michelle Silver
Semester
Fall

Description
PSYC12 – Chapter 2 Notes Inzlicht Stereotype Threat • As Steele describes, the initial aim of stereotype threat research was to examine  those factors suppressing the intellectual performance of black students and  women in math, science, and engineering • When situational cues in a setting make a stereotype salient and relevant to one’s  actions, the resulting psychological pressure to disprove the stereotype might  depress academic performance o Stereotype threat theory posited that these differences might be attributed  to features of the situation (this sentence came before ^ one in textbook) • Propose that the meaning(s) people derive from situational cues ultimately affects  whether they become vulnerable to – or protected against – stereotype threat • Drawing from Social Identity Theory, stereotype threat theory begins with the  assumptions that each person has multiple social identities o When situational cues signal an identity’s value or importance in a setting,  that particular group membership becomes more salient than the others  and a vigilance process is initiated • During the vigilance phase of stereotype threat, people’s attention is directed to  other situational cues in the environment to determine whether the identity may be  a liability • Two appraisals are possible: o If cues in the social environment disconfirm the possibility that one’s  social identity will likely be a source of stigma, devaluation, or  mistreatment, vigilance relaxes o If situational cues confirm the possibility that one’s social identity is likely  to be negatively evaluated, vigilance increases • In a study, male and female MSE majors watched a video advertising a  prestigious MSE summer conference, that depicted a gender ratio of either three  men to one woman (ratio typically found in American MSE settings), or a  balanced ratio of 1:1 o Women majors who watched the 3:1 video reported less belonging in MSE  and expressed little desire to attend the conference; moreover, they were  highly vigilant compared to women who watched the gender­balanced  video and men who watched either video • The situational cue of of numeric representation caused these MSE women to  engage a vigilance process – deploying attention to situational cues, both within  the video and their local environment, to determine the value of their gender  identity in the MSE conference setting • Certain situational cues will be less threatening for people not personally invested  in particular domains • People who are more identified with their stereotyped social group are also more  vulnerable to stereotype threat effects • It is clear then, that the psychological and behavioural experiences of stereotype  threat are grounded in an environment’s situational cues • Two cues – the diagnosticity of a test and the relevance of a stereotype to people’s  test performance – reliably produce stereotype threat among groups whose  intellectual abilities are negatively stereotyped • The cue of diagnosticity signals to people that the test they are about to take is a  valid predictor of their intellectual abilities • Studies that evoke stereotype relevance either explicitly refer to group stereotypes  more subtly suggest that stereotypes may be relevant to one’s performance • Research has shown that linking one’s identity to one’s performance or future  potential subtly suggests diagnosticity and relevance o For instance, indicating one’s race or gender on demographic questions  increases the salience of stereotypes related to those group memberships  and reduces performance, both in the lab and in the world • Highlighting the potential for evaluation also intensifies stereotype threat • Stereotypes thereby are made relevant by emphasizing a test’s importance,  explicitly linking it to other, presumably more important abilities, such as one’s  general intelligence or future academic potential • Studies have shown that when a test is notoriously important – such as when it  predicts future academic opportunities or scholarships – no additional cue is  necessary to induce stereotype threat • Thus, all that appear necessary for stereotype threat effects to emerge, is that  individuals are both aware of the stereotype and aware that the performance task  is diagnostic of the ability in question • Research has shown that the organization of a setting significantly moderates  stereotype threat effects  • Several studies have revealed that the number of whites or men in a setting can  significantly affect the performance of racial minorities and women, respectively • All people have social identities that – given a particular collection of cues –  trigger stereotype threat  • In a set of studies investigating the effects of the media, relative to the neutral ads,  the stereotypic ads activated gender stereotypes and reduced women’s inclinations  to occupy leadership roles o Moreover, the stereotypic commercials depressed women’s subsequent  performance eon a non­diagnostic math test, whereas men and women  who watched the counter­stereotypic commercials performed equally well • A final set of studies reveals tat other peoples behavi
More Less

Related notes for HLTC22H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit