Textbook Notes (368,629)
Canada (162,027)
MGTA01H3 (583)
Chapter 1

Chapter 1-management.docx

7 Pages
96 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Management (MGT)
Course
MGTA01H3
Professor
Chris Bovaird
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 1 Understanding the Canadian Business System  The  concept of Business and Profit  Buisness: an organization that seeks to earn profits by providing goods and services ­ an organization that produces or sells goods or services in an effort to make a profit  Profit: is what remains after a buisness’s expenses have been subtracted from its  revenues Expenses: the money a business spends producing its goods and services and generally  running the business. Also refered to as “Cost”  Revenues: the money a business earns selling its products and services. Aka. Sales  ­ among the most profitable companies in 2005 were, royal bank of Canada, Manulife  financial, and imperial oil  ­ a healthy business climate also contributes directly to our quality of life and standard of  living  ­ business profits enhance the personal incomes of millions of owners and stockholders,  and business taxes help to support governments at all levels  ­ many buisnesses support charities and provide community leadership  Economic Systems around the world  Economic system: the way in which a nation allocates its resources among its citizens ­ economic systems differ in terms of who owns and controls these resources, known as  the factor of production  Factors of Production  ­ the key difference between economic systems is the way in which they manage the  factors of production­ the basic resources that a country’s businesses use to produce  goods and services ­ traditionally economists have focused on 4 factors of production: labour, capitral,  entrepreneurs, natural resources  Labour: the mental and physical training and talents of people; sometimes called human  resources  ­ the people who work for a company  Capital: the funds needed to operate an enterprise ­ the financial resources needed to operate an enterprise ­ need capital to start a new business and then to keep it running and growing  ­ revenue from the sales of products is key and ongoing source of capital once a business  has opened its doors  Entrepreneurs: an individual who organizes and manages labour, capital, and natural  resources to produce goods and services to earn a profit, but who also runs the risk of  failure  Natural resources: items used in the production of goods and services in their natural  state, including land, water, mineral deposits, and trees  ­ include all physical resources , ex. Land where it is created etc  Information Resources: information such as market forecasts, economic data, and  specialized knowledge of employees that is useful to a business and that helps it achieve  its goals  ­ much of what they do results in either the creating of new information, or the  repackaging of existing information for new users and different audiences Types of Economic Systems  ­ economic systems differ in the way that decisions are made about production and  allocation  Command Economy: an economic system in which government controls all or most  factors of production and makes all or most production decisions  Market Economy: an economic system in which individuals control all or most factors  of production and make all or most production decisions  Command Economies ­ 2 most basic forms of command economies are communism, and socialism  Communism: a type of command economy in which the government owns and operates  all industries  ­ originally proposed by karl marx Socialism: a kind of command economy in which the government owns and operates the  main industries while individuals own and operate less crucial industries ­ smaller businesses such as clothing stores, and resteraunts may be privately owned ­ extensive public welfare systems have also resulted in very high taxes Market Economies Market: a mechanism for exchange between the buyers and sellers of a particular good  or service  ­ both buyer and sellers enjoy freedom of choice  Capitalism Capitalism: a kind of market economy offering private ownership of the factors of  production and of profits from business activity  ­ when sanctions the private ownership of the factors of production and encourages  entrepreneurship by offering profits as incentive  Mixed Market Economies   Mixed market economy: an economic system with elements of both a command  economy and a market economy, in practice typical of most nations’ economies  ­ most countries of the former eastern bloc have now adopted market mechanisms  through a process called privatization  Privatization: the transfer of activities from the government to the public sector  Deregulation: a reduction in the number of laws affecting business activity  ­ evident in many industries including arilines, pipelines, banking and trucking and  communications  Interactions between business and Government  How Government influences Business Government as customer  ­ the government is also the largest purchaser of advertising in Canada ­ governemtn buys thousands of diff products and services from business firms, including  office supplies, office buildsings, computers, battleships, helicopters, highways, water  treatment plans, management and engineering consulting services  Government as competitor ­ competes with business through crown corporations, which are accountable to a  minister of parliament for their conduct  Government as Regulator ­ regulates business through many administrative boards, trubunals, or commissions  ­ at a federal level, Canadian radio­television and telecommunications, Canadian  transport commission , makes desicisons about routes and rate applications  ­ provincial also regulate business through their decisions  ­ there are several reasons for regulating business activity  ­ protecting competition, protecting consumers, achieving social goals, and  protecting the environment  Government as taxation Agent  ­ taxes are imposed and collected by federal, provincial and local governemnts Revenue taxes : (income taxes) taxes whose main purpose is to fund government  services and programs   Progressive revenue: taxes levied at a higher rate on higher­income taxpayers and at a  lower rate on lower income taxpayers Regressive revenue taxes: (sale taxes) : taxes that cause poorer people to pay a higher  percentage of income than richer people pay ­are leived at the same rate regarless of a person’s income  restrictive taxes(taxes on alcohol, tabacco, and gasoline)
More Less

Related notes for MGTA01H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit