Textbook Notes (381,070)
CA (168,341)
UTSC (19,304)
MGH (426)
MGHB02H3 (292)
Chapter 13

Ch. 13 Notes

6 Pages
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Department
Management (MGH)
Course Code
MGHB02H3
Professor
Julie Mc Carthy

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What is Conflict?
Interpersonal Conflict: Process that occurs when one person, group or organizational subunit frus-
trates the goal attainment of another. The conflicting parities might develop a dislike for each other,
see each other as unreasonable and develop negative stereotypes of their opposites. Antagonistic be-
haviours might include name calling, sabotage, or even physical aggression.
Causes of Organizational Conflict
Group Identification and Intergroup Bias - Identification with a particular group or class of peo-
ple can set the stage for organizational conflict. Self-esteem is probably a critical factor. Identi-
fying with the successes of one’s own group and disassociating oneself from out-group failures
boosts self-esteem and provides comforting feelings of social solidarity. In organizations, there
are a number of groups or classes with which people might identify. Based on personal charac-
teristics (e.g., race or gender), job functions (e.g., sales or production) or job level (e.g., manager
or non-manager).
Interdependence - when individuals or subunits are mutually dependent on each other to accom-
plish their own goals, the potential for conflict exists. It necessitates interaction between the par-
ties so that they can co-ordinate their interests. In addition, it means that each party has some
power over the other
Differences in power, status or culture -
Power: If dependence is not mutual but one-way, the potential for conflict increases. If party
A needs the collaboration of party B to accomplish its goal but B does not need As assis-
tance, antagonism may develop.
Status: Conflict arises when people of lower status are dependent on those of higher status
Culture: When two or more cultures develop in an organization, the clash in beliefs and val-
ues can result in overt conflict
May 5, 2011 5:09 PM
W6:Ch.13
www.notesolution.com
Ambiguity - Ambiguous goals, jurisdictions, or performance criteria can lead to conflict (e.g.,
sales and production)
Scarce Resources
Types of Conflict
Relationship Conflict: Interpersonal tension among individuals that have to do with their relationship
per se, not the task at hand
Task Conflict: Disagreement about the nature of the work to be done (e.g., different goals)
Process Conflict: Disagreement about how work should be organized and accomplished (e.g., dis-
agreement about how work should be organized and accomplished)
Occasionally, some degree of task conflict might actually be beneficial for team performance,
especially when the task is non-routine and requires a variety of perspectives to be considered.
Modes of Managing Conflict
Avoiding: A conflict management style characterized by low assertiveness of one’s own interests and
low cooperation with the other party (i.e., hiding the head in the sand). Although it can provide some
ST stress reduction, it does not really change the situation.
Accommodating: A conflict management style in which one cooperates with the other party while not
asserting one’s own interests. It can be a sign of weakness or an effective way to build goodwill.
Competing: A conflict management style that maximizes assertiveness and minimizes cooperation
(e.g., create a win-lose situation, where full priority is given to your own goals)
Compromise: A conflict management style that combines intermediate levels of assertiveness and co-
operation (i.e., compromise between pure competition and pure accommodation)
Collaborating: A conflict management style that maximizes both assertiveness and cooperation that
full satisfies the interests of both parties (i.e., emphasis is on win-win resolution). It probably works
best when the conflict is not internse and when each party has information that is useful to the other.
Although effective collaboration can take time and practice to develop, it frequently enhances produc-
tivity and achievement.
May 5, 2011 5:09 PM
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Description
May 5, 2011 5:09 PM W6:Ch.13 WhatisConflict? Interpersonal Conflict: Process that occurs when one person, group or organizational subunit frus- trates the goal attainment of another. The conflicting parities might develop a dislike for each other, see each other as unreasonable and develop negative stereotypes of their opposites.Antagonistic be- haviours might include name calling, sabotage, or even physical aggression. Causes of Organizational Conflict Group Identification and Intergroup Bias - Identification with a particular group or class of peo- ple can set the stage for organizational conflict. Self-esteem is probably a critical factor. Identi- fying with the successes of ones own group and disassociating oneself from out-group failures boosts self-esteem and provides comforting feelings of social solidarity. In organizations, there are a number of groups or classes with which people might identify. Based on personal charac- teristics (e.g., race or gender), job functions (e.g., sales or production) or job level (e.g., manager or non-manager). Interdependence - when individuals or subunits are mutually dependent on each other to accom- plish their own goals, the potential for conflict exists. It necessitates interaction between the par- ties so that they can co-ordinate their interests. In addition, it means that each party has some power over the other Differences in power, status or culture - Power: If dependence is not mutual but one-way, the potential for conflict increases. If party Aneeds the collaboration of party B to accomplish its goal but B does not needAs assis- tance, antagonism may develop. Status: Conflict arises when people of lower status are dependent on those of higher status Culture: When two or more cultures develop in an organization, the clash in beliefs and val- ues can result in overt conflict www.notesolution.com
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