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Chapter 10

Speaking Your Way To The Top - Chapter 10


Department
Management (MGT)
Course Code
MGTA36H3
Professor
J Howard
Chapter
10

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MGTC36 Speaking Your Way To The Top Chapter 10
Chapter 10: The Five Styles of Delivery
o Different speaking situations call for different styles of delivery, there are 5 styles
- 1. Impromptu Style
Also known as off-the-cuff speeches where they are given at the spur of the
moment
Most presentations are impromptus (e.g. in a meeting, you are asked to give a
status report on a project)
Secret to being successful at impromptu speaking is to relax & let your
knowledge of the subject work for you
When you know you subject well, it is easier to relax and speak
If you are going to a meeting and suspect that you will be asked for an
opinion, do some homework on the topic being discussed so you will be able
to add your input to the occasion
Successful impromptu speaking offers you an opportunity to shine and
thereby to impress colleagues/boss
- 2. Extemporaneous Style
Extemporaneous presentations are planned, prepared, and practiced
They are polished presentations that can be given many times but are
different each time in order to adapt to your audience (e.g. re-election
campaign speech would be similar but not the same in every region)
- 3. Expromptu
A combination of extemporaneous and impromptu styles of delivery where it
is prepared but not practiced
Examples would include meetings, conferences, and debates where you may
be asked to participate, have some time to put your thoughts together, but
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You will have time to write an opening sentence as well as a closing sentence
to end your presentation
- 4. Manuscript
Written and read word-for-read
Best to avoid this style unless you have to use the manuscript style, try to
paraphrase parts of the speech that does not have to be presented exactly as
written
- 5. Memorized
Recited word-for-word (try to avoid altogether)
Oral language consists of short sentences and phrases, contractions, slang,
and starts and stops
Written language consists of longer, more formal sentences with transitions,
spoken may not sound good
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