Textbook Notes (381,122)
CA (168,361)
UTSC (19,305)
PHYA10H3 (20)
Chapter 13

Chapter 13 Notes

4 Pages
166 Views

Department
Physics and Astrophysics
Course Code
PHYA10H3
Professor
Johann Bayer

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 4 pages of the document.
Chapter 13: Newtons Theory of Gravity
The force of gravity is responsible for phenomena ranging from orbiting space shuttles,
solar eclipses and the dynamics and the expansion of the universe.
13.1 A Little History
The study of the structure of the universe is called cosmology.
Tycho and Kepler
Keplers work led him to find that the orbits are not circles but ellipses. Also that the
speed of a planet is not constant but varies as it moves around the ellipse.
Keplers Laws as we call them state that:
1.Planets move in elliptical orbits, with the sun at one focus of the ellipse.
2.A line drawn between the sun and a planet sweeps out equal areas
during equal intervals of time.
3.The square of a planets orbital period is proportional to the cube of the
semi major-axis length.
The long axis of an ellipse is called the major axis while half the length is called the
semi-major axis.
Kepler also suggested that the sun somehow exerts forces on the planets that
determines their motion.
13.2 Isaac Newton
Newtons genius was realizing that the force of the sun on the planets was identical
to the force of the earth on the apple.
Gravitation is a universal force between all objects in the universe.
13.3 Newtons Law of Gravity
Newton proposed that every object in the universe attracts every other object with a
force that is:
1. Inversely proportional to the square distance between the objects.
2.Directly proportional to the product of the masses of the two objects.
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
Chapter 13: Newtons Theory of Gravity The force of gravity is responsible for phenomena ranging from orbiting space shuttles, solar eclipses and the dynamics and the expansion of the universe. 13.1 A Little History The study of the structure of the universe is called cosmology. Tycho and Kepler Keplers work led him to find that the orbits are not circles but ellipses. Also that the speed of a planet is not constant but varies as it moves around the ellipse. Keplers Laws as we call them state that: 1. Planets move in elliptical orbits, with the sun at one focus of the ellipse. 2. A line drawn between the sun and a planet sweeps out equal areas during equal intervals of time. 3. The square of a planets orbital period is proportional to the cube of the semi major-axis length. The long axis of an ellipse is called the major axis while half the length is called the semi-major axis. Kepler also suggested that the sun somehow exerts forces on the planets that determines their motion. 13.2 Isaac Newton Newtons genius was realizing that the force of the sun on the planets was identical to the force of the earth on the apple. Gravitation is a universal force between all objects in the universe. 13.3 Newtons Law of Gravity Newton proposed that every object in the universe attracts every other object with a force that is: 1. Inversely proportional to the square distance between the objects. 2. Directly proportional to the product of the masses of the two objects. www.notesolution.com
More Less
Unlock Document


Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit