WK 11 polb93 Readings (Articles)

8 Pages
79 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POLB92H3
Professor
Spyridon Kotsovilis
Semester
Winter

Description
POLB93 Exam Review (April 22     7­9PM SW128)   Multiple Choice Qs,(Choice of) Essay Questions, 2  part of term material ONLY. Worth 35% WK 11: WK 11: Way & Levitsky – International Linkage and Democratization • The post­Cold War International environment operated along 2 dimensions: Western  leverage, (govt’s vulnerability to external pressure) and Linkage to the West (or the  density of a country’s ties to the West, the EU…) • Mechanisms of leverage such as diplomatic pressure, or conditionality were­­by  themselves­­rarely sufficient to democratize post­Cold War autocracies • Rather, the more subtle and diffuse effects of linkage contributed more consistently to  democratization • Now that the USSR had been demolished,  developing­world elites adopted formal  democratic institution but East Bloc countries that had adopted multi­party elections  abused democratic procedures • Heavily tilted in favour of incumbents (undemocratic) • The divergent paths of these regimes were heavily influenced by countries’ relationships  to the West Levels of Leverage • Western leverage, (govt’s vulnerability to external pressure) can be exerted by: political  conditionality and punitive sanctions, diplomatic pressure, military intervention • Level of pressure determined by 1) raw size of state along w/military and economic  strength. Weak states are vulnerable, threats are less likely to be employed on powerful  countries • 2) Existence of competing issues on Western foreign policy agendas. Leverage is limited  where Western interests are at stake • 3) Leverage is reduced where govts have access to political, economic or military support  from alt. regional power i.e. Russia provides support to other autocrats • Leverage raises the costs of repression and govt abuses BUT leverage is rarely sufficient  to install democratization  • International actors focused too strongly on installing elections, neglecting civil liberties  and a level political playing field • Western pressure failed to deter subtle abuses of power: manipulation of media,  harassment of opposition, electoral fraud Degrees of Linkage •  Economic linkage   (investment/assistance), Geopolitical linkage (ties to Western led  alliances/organizations), Social linkage (tourism, migration), Communication linkage  (Western media penetration) and Transnational Civil Society linkage (ties to NGOs,  churches, party organizations) • Primary source of linkage is GEOGRAPHY. Those near the US/EU are characterized by  greater economic interaction • Linkage raises the cost of authoritarianism by:  • Heightening importance of govt abuse, amplifying minor abuses of power in media • Increasing probability of international response, intense lobbying by NGOs, human  rights groups convinced Clinton administration to take strong action against Haiti’s  military regime in 94’ • Creating domestic stakeholders in democracy, by increasing the number of  organizations, firms, individuals with ties to the West, linkage forces constituencies to  adhere to int. norms. Linkage blurs international/domestic politics • Reshaping domestic balance of power in favour of democrats, ties to foreign actors  can help protect opposition groups from repression and support pro­democratic actors • EU enlargement process enhanced both linkage and leverage in candidate countries as  membership entails a high level of integration and policy  coordination • EU is not limited to elections, it includes respect for human rights and reinforces  monitoring of electoral processes • The “big prize” of EU membership creates strong incentive to democratize • Unlike leverage, linkage is a source of “soft power”, effects are diffuse, create a number  pressure points autocrats cannot ignore, linkage is more persistent and pervasive  • Variation in leverage and linkage is critical in examining diverging fates of competitive  authoritarian regimes • In the eyes of an authoritarian regime, overt repression is damaging to a regime’s  reputation but if opposition challenges are allowed to run their course, those incumbents  might lose power • Hence, they choose between allowing serious opposition and violating democratic  procedures and costing them international isolation • Where linkage is low and leverage is high, cost of abuse of power remains significant but  incentives to be play by democratic rules are weak, resulting in unstable authoritarianism • In cases of low linkage and low leverage, even serious abuses of power rarely  reverberated in the West. i.e. Middle East, likely to remain stable non­democracies • Where linkage is extensive, democratization is widespread. Where only leverage is  extensive (African nations), political developments have little salience • Linkage is integral. Where linkage is lower regime outcomes are likely to become a  product of domestic factors • Although leverage deters the worst authoritarian abuses, sustainable democracies can  most likely be produced in high­linkage cases • Linkage is a primarily a structural variable, a product of geography and historical factors • Sanctions and isolated policies (leverage) will not provide the results that linkage  potentially could WK 11: Milada Anna Vachudova – The Leverage of International Institutions on Democratizing  States: Eastern Europe and the European Union • Enormous benefits and demanding requirements of EU membership created conditions  for the unprecedented influence of an int. institution on domestic policies of aspiring  member­states BUT the same traction wasn’t accomplished for all Eastern Euro states •  Some  call local elites who join the EU, “too weak to protect their sovereignty” while  others consider it  a function of their economic strength or their geographical distance  from the EU’s border • This essay demonstrates that  the explanations are not as one­sided as that, using Poland,  Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Bulgaria and Romania  • The key variable is the presence or absence of a strong opposition to Communism which  determines if they are liberal or nationalist in their pursuit of change • Nationalists jeopardized their state’s progress toward EU membership by adopting ethnic  nationalism strategies and economic corruption which were incompatible with the EU’s  liberal requirements • Passive vs. Active Leverage, how they influence credibility of EU on future members • Passive Leverage: Attraction of EU membership by its own merits. Active Leverage:  Deliberate conditionality exercised in the EU pre­accession process • Two periods 1989­1994 (predominantly passive leverage) and 1995­1999 (Predominantly  active leverage).  • In the first period, the EU’s passive leverage only reinforced existing domestic strategies  of reform in liberal states. No success in changing domestic policies of nationalist nations •  Second period, passive and active leverage were causally important in effecting change  in nationalist states. Those excluded from the EU were vocally condemned • EU tarnished the image of nationalist states. The pro­Western prospect of EU  membership was attractive to voters. As a result nationalist governments were replaced  by pro­Western reformers in Romania, Bulgaria, Slovakia…  • Whether the opposition to communism was strong enough  to take power determined  which strategy was most effective • The traction of the EU is so great that it can push states away from one political ideology  to another due to its tremendous benefits combined with its extensive requirements of  membership • Article is 3 fold 1) The character of EU’s leverage on aspiring members 2) responses of  democratizing states to EU’s incentives in first period when int. factors were insignificant  3) How the active/passive leverage influenced these responses and  affected the course of  domestic political chance in the second perio
More Less

Related notes for POLB92H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit