WK 12 polb93 Readings (Articles)

7 Pages
73 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POLB92H3
Professor
Spyridon Kotsovilis
Semester
Winter

Description
POLB93 Exam Review (April 22    7­9PM SW128)   Multiple Choice Qs,(Choice of) Essay Questions, 2  part of term material ONLY. Worth 35% WK 12:  Colour Revolutions (Lecture Notes) ‘Weak state capacity increases the odds that a variety of contingent factors will result in  authoritarian breakdown’(Way 2009).  Stability of Authoritarian states depends on Domestic Sources and International  Linkage and Leverage 1) Scope: Effective reach of state’s coercive capacity 2) Cohesion: level of compliance within the state depends on fiscal health, personal  ties(ethnicity) and shared ideology (religion, party organization important) Strategies of Authoritarian Regimes (Domestic) 1) Dismissal 2) Reform 3) Conciliation ­ symbolic gesturing ­ channeling/co­optation      4) Repression (Soft, Hard) Soft  channeling/co­optation  restriction of flow of information, resources, expertise  creation of parallel organizations to challenge opposition  rigging elections Hard  Imposition of negative sanctions and intimidation  Coercion  state or outsourced vigilantism and/or elimination International Dimension (Linkage & Leverage) Oppositions in the Color Revolutions received important information, technical know­how and  critical funding from trans­national NGOs. Also, do not ignore: a) Role of economic, political, social and informational Linkages b) Leverage by western powers, associated with economic incentives and conditional terms of  acceptance to Western institutions (e.g. the European Union) by competing regional powers.  Incumbents also use them to counter potential threats to their power c. Geographic proximity (‘spheres of influence’) WK 12: Lucan Way – The Real Causes of the Colour Revolutions (Not an interrelated wave) •  Way contends: longer­term variables such as autocratic state and party capacity and  the strength of a country’s connection to the West may held shed light on why  certain countries have experienced such revolutions while others have not • Lucan Way argues that structural factors —as opposed to electoral and diffusion  dynamics—constitute the “real” cause of the recent wave of electoral triumphs over  dictators in post­communist Europe and Eurasia • Although diffusion throughout the former Soviet sphere has been extensive, it has not in  most cases been decisive in shaping outcomes therefore, “wave” is misleading • Transnational networks of previously successful activists, with assistance from the U.S.  Agency for International Development (USAID) and other organizations are credited  with stimulating transitions in countries that lacked sufficient prerequisites for revolution  and where the fall of autocrats was not predicted by most analysts • Diffusion in the 80’s: Authoritarian failure in one country made seemingly secure and  well­entrenched single­party regimes suddenly and almost magically appear doomed to  failure. But Autocrats in countries like Belarus and Russia have learned to counter this  model • In Lucan Way’s structural account, the colour revolutions had to happen.Each was  separately determined by the weakness of the authoritarian regimes • “Regime collapses have resulted more from authoritarian weakness than opposition  strength” (62). For Way, it is even misleading to conceptualize these events as  revolutions; they were authoritarian turnovers involving defections from incumbent  leaders by their own allies due to the failure of these regimes to consolidate themselves  (67) • Moreover, according to Way, these events should not be thought of as an interrelated  wave, as each would have occurred even if the other cases in the neighborhood had not  materialized and even without the influence of transnational linkages. Rather, they were  merely a collection of individual and separate cases • Even ties with the United States and Western Europe are viewed by Way in large part as  factors affecting the resources available to authoritarian regimes rather than to regime  opponents (60–61) Limits of Diffusion • Diffusion has dominated the scholarship on recent revolutions because there has in fact  been an enormous exchange of ideas, skills, and people within the post­communist region  HOWEVER, diffusion has played a less determinative role in recent post­communist  authoritarian breakdowns than in other recent “waves,” • In 2004 and again in 2008, the opposition in Armenia consciously modeled its efforts on  the Rose Revolution in Georgia, but both times failed to unseat the regime • Kuchma in Ukraine fell from power even after he had carefully studied the Georgian case  and made every effort to avoid Shevardnadze’s fate. Thus it is not clear that the diffusion  of lessons from abroad has had a strong impact on the success or failure of autocratic rule Linkage and Organizational Power • Authoritarian stability is most affected by: 1) the strength of a country’s ties to the West;  and 2) the strength of the incumbent regime’s autocratic party or state • Where linkage is high, as in Central and Southeastern Europe, not a single authoritarian  regime has survived the post–Cold War era. Where linkage is relatively low, as in the  former Soviet Union, Western commitment to democratization has been less intense • Serbia’s proximity to Western Europe explains why NATO opted for a military response  to ethnic abuses in Kosovo, but took little action in response to similar or worse crises in  other parts of the world • By the fall of 2000, Milošević was in an even more precarious position as Serbia faced  looming blackouts in the dead of winter • (Most of his arguments restated in “A Reply to my Critics”) WK 12: Mark Beissinger – An Interrelated Wave (Opposes Lucan Way’s view) • Lucan Way’s view is half an argument, fails to address mobilizational strength • Authoritarian weakness alone cannot explain why the mobilization process during the  color revolutions assumed similar forms across varied contexts, one after the other in a  compressed period of time • The successful color revolutions mobilized enormous numbers of people and largely  pursued peaceful tactics of nonviolent resistance that were well planned in advance • In Georgia, Ukraine and Serbia, the mobilizations played a critical role in the outcome of  events, in part by foiling the incumbent rulers’ attempts to fix elections, repress  challengers, and forcibly remove threats to the regime. • The mobilization of people was critical in bringing about a change in regime. The larger  the protest, the greater the ability to avoid repression, disrupt state operations, and force  defections from a regime – these weren’t just authoritarian turnovers, these were  revolutions • Many of the key actors who were involved have themselves ascribed considerable  importance to cross­national ties and influences and to transnational civil society  programs. These revolutions borrowed tactics, organizational forms, slogans, and even  logos from one another. (Diffusion) • “Way would have us believe that all the cars of authoritarianism ran out of gas at the  same time” (76) • The most plausible explanation? They were a part of an interrelated wave.  Neighbourhood and demonstration effects play important roles in democratizing  outcomes • Stats demonstrate the odds of an authoritarian regime democratizing increase from 6­10%  for each country surrounding that is already a democracy.  • Linkages are the norm, not the exception. For Way’s argument to be correct, it would  have to account for why the color revolutions, if they were isolated rather than  interrelated cases, were exceptional in the pol
More Less

Related notes for POLB92H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit