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PSYA01H3 (1,302)
Steve Joordens (1,140)
Chapter 3

Chapter 3 study guide

4 Pages
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Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYA01H3
Professor
Steve Joordens

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Chapter 3: Evolution, Heredity, and Behaviour
The Development of Evolutionary Theory
-Biological evolution: changes that take place in the genetic and physical characteristics of a
population or group of organisms over time
-Darwins theory is used to help understand behaviour
-Voyage of the Beagle
oDarwin was on a boat
oSpent time collecting creatures and objects of every sort
-Origin of Species
oHe reviewed the work of earlier naturalists
oBecame interested in artificial selection
Particular animals are deliberately mated to produce offspring that possess a
specially desirable characteristic
oBecame interested in natural selection
The fact that organisms reproduce differentially: within any given population,
some members of a given species will produce more offspring than will others
-Natural Selection
oNatural selection is based on two premises:
Individuals within a population show variability in heritable behavioural and
physical characteristics
The capacity of the environment to sustain a population of any species is limited,
producing competition
oHe studied natural history which convinced him that behavioural adaptations were
important to survival and therefore an important part of evolution
oAbility of an individual to produce offspring defines that individuals reproductive
stress: number of viable offspring it produces relative to the number of viable offspring
produced by other members of the same species.
osurvival of the fittest does not always mean most fit or strongest
www.notesolution.com

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Description
Chapter 3: Evolution, Heredity, and Behaviour The Development of Evolutionary Theory - Biological evolution: changes that take place in the genetic and physical characteristics of a population or group of organisms over time - Darwins theory is used to help understand behaviour - Voyage of the Beagle o Darwin was on a boat o Spent time collecting creatures and objects of every sort - Origin of Species o He reviewed the work of earlier naturalists o Became interested in artificial selection Particular animals are deliberately mated to produce offspring that possess a specially desirable characteristic o Became interested in natural selection The fact that organisms reproduce differentially: within any given population, some members of a given species will produce more offspring than will others - Natural Selection o Natural selection is based on two premises: Individuals within a population show variability in heritable behavioural and physical characteristics The capacity of the environment to sustain a population of any species is limited, producing competition o He studied natural history which convinced him that behavioural adaptations were important to survival and therefore an important part of evolution o Ability of an individual to produce offspring defines that individuals reproductive stress: number of viable offspring it produces relative to the number of viable offspring produced by other members of the same species. o survival of the fittest does not always mean most fit or strongest www.notesolution.com
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