Textbook Notes (380,713)
CA (168,179)
UTSC (19,290)
Psychology (10,038)
PSYB10H3 (649)
Chapter 2

Chapter 2

3 Pages
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Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYB10H3
Professor
Elizabeth Page- Gould

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CHAPTER 2
Methodology: How Social Psychologists Do Research
-goal of social psychology is to answer questions about social behaviour scientifically
-hypotheses, testable statements or ideas about relationship between two or more
variables, that social psychologists test come from many sources
osometimes researchers are inspired by previous studies and theories, organized
sets of principles that can be used to explain observed phenomena
oat other times, researchers come up with hypotheses from their own personal
observations of social events
-principal research designs used are observational, correlational, and experimental
methods
-each method allows researcher to make different type of statement about his or her
findings
-regardless of method use, important for researchers to provide operational definition for
their variables, meaning a precise specification of how variables are measured or
manipulated
-observational methods vary in terms of how visible the researcher is
ocan be unobtrusive, or can interact with people being observed, also known as
ethnography
-in archival analysis, researcher examines accumulated documents of archives of culture
-when conducting observational research, important to establish interjudge reliability,
which is level of agreement between two or more people who independently observe and
code set of data
-correlational method is technique whereby researchers systematically measure two or
more variables and assess relation between them
-survey research is one where representative sample of people are asked questions about
their attitudes or behaviour
-correlational coefficient is statistical technique that reveals extent to which one variable
can be predicted from another
ooften calculated from survey data, in which there is random selection
orandom sample is chosen from larger population
oensures that responses of sample are representative of those of population
-major drawback is that it cannot determine causality
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Description
CHAPTER 2 Methodology: How Social Psychologists Do Research - goal of social psychology is to answer questions about social behaviour scientifically - hypotheses, testable statements or ideas about relationship between two or more variables, that social psychologists test come from many sources o sometimes researchers are inspired by previous studies and theories, organized sets of principles that can be used to explain observed phenomena o at other times, researchers come up with hypotheses from their own personal observations of social events - principal research designs used are observational, correlational, and experimental methods - each method allows researcher to make different type of statement about his or her findings - regardless of method use, important for researchers to provide operational definition for their variables, meaning a precise specification of how variables are measured or manipulated - observational methods vary in terms of how visible the researcher is
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