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Chapter 9

Chapter 9

7 Pages
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Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYB10H3
Professor
Elizabeth Page- Gould

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Chapter 9
Interpersonal Attraction: From First Impressions to Close Relationships
Major Antecedents of Attraction
-a central human motivation is self-expansion, the desire to overlap or blend with another
person so that you have access to person’s knowledge, insights, and experiences
oacquire new resources and deepen your own experience of life
The Person Next Door: The Propinquity Effect
-one of simplest determinants of interpersonal attraction is proximity
opeople who, by chance, you see and interact with most often are most likely to
become your friends and lovers
ocalled the propinquity effect, and only works on micro level
-functional distance is defined as certain aspects of architectural design that make it likely
that some people will come into contact with each other more often than with others
-propinquity effect works because of familiarity, or the mere exposure effect
othe more exposure we have to stimulus, the more apt we are to like it
-if you feel negatively toward person in question, the more exposure you have to them, the
more you dislike them
-familiarity can occur without physical exposure
Similarity
-similarity is the match between our interests, background, attitudes, and values and those
of other person
-the concept of complimentary refers to people who are our opposites
-we tend to think that people who are similar to us will be inclined to like us
-people who are similar provide us with important social validation for our characteristics
and beliefs
oprovide us with feeling that we are right
-more likely to feel understood by those similar to us
Reciprocal Liking
-reciprocal liking is liking someone who likes us in return
-liking is so powerful it can even make up for absence of similarity
-effects can only occur if you like yourself in the first place
opeople with negative self-concepts tend to be skeptical about others actually
liking them and therefore do not necessarily reciprocate liking
www.notesolution.com
The Effects of Physical Attractiveness on Liking
-physical attractiveness of dates was strongest predictor for liking your partner
-when asked about qualities they desire in dating partner, physical attractiveness is not
high on list
owhen it comes to actual behaviour, appearances seems to be the only thing that
matters
-tendency for men to place greater emphasis on looks, particularly when choosing long-
term mate
What is Attractive?
-specific definition of beauty that media tells us is associated with goodness
-high attractiveness ratings were given to faces with large eyes, small nose, small chin,
prominent cheekbones and narrow cheeks, high eyebrows, large pupils and a big smile
ohigher ratings in men were associated with large eyes, prominent cheekbones,
large chin, and big smile
-large eyes are considered to be a ‘baby face’ feature, for newborn mammals have very
large eyes for size of their face
othought to be attractive because they elicit feelings of warmth and nurturance in
perceivers
Cultural Standards of Beauty
-even though racial and ethnic groups do vary in specific facial features, people from wide
range of cultures agree on what is attractive in human face
-attractive faces for both sexes are those whose features are the arithmetic mean for the
species, not the extremes
-we like ‘average composite face because it has lost some of the atypical or unfamiliar
variation that makes up individual faces
-if composite face is created with highly attractive faces, we find composite more
attractive than composite made of faces that are average in attractiveness
The Power of Familiarity
-people prefer faces that most resemble their own
-all attractions may be expressions of our underlying preference for familiar and safe over
unfamiliar and potentially dangerous
Assumptions about Attractive People
-we are attracted to what is beautiful, which can lead to unfair treatment
-most people assume that attractiveness is highly correlated with other desirable traits
o‘what is beautiful is good’ stereotype
www.notesolution.com

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Description
Chapter 9 Interpersonal Attraction: From First Impressions to Close Relationships Major Antecedents of Attraction - a central human motivation is self-expansion, the desire to overlap or blend with another person so that you have access to persons knowledge, insights, and experiences o acquire new resources and deepen your own experience of life The Person Next Door: The Propinquity Effect - one of simplest determinants of interpersonal attraction is proximity o people who, by chance, you see and interact with most often are most likely to become your friends and lovers o called the propinquity effect, and only works on micro level - functional distance is defined as certain aspects of architectural design that make it likely that some people will come into contact with each other more often than with others - propinquity effect works because of familiarity, or the mere exposure effect o the more exposure we have to stimulus, the more apt we are to like it - if you feel negatively toward person in question, the more exposure you have to them, the more you dislike them - familiarity can occur without physical exposure Similarity - similarity is the match between our interests, background, attitudes, and values and those of other person - the concept of complimentary refers to people who are our opposites - we tend to think that people who are similar to us will be inclined to like us - people who are similar provide us with important social validation for our characteristics and beliefs o provide us with feeling that we are right - more likely to feel understood by those similar to us Reciprocal Liking - reciprocal liking is liking someone who likes us in return - liking is so powerful it can even make up for absence of similarity - effects can only occur if you like yourself in the first place o people with negative self-concepts tend to be skeptical about others actually liking them and therefore do not necessarily reciprocate liking www.notesolution.com
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