Chapter 7 covered in week 6 of FALL 2010 semester

9 views1 pages
Published on 31 Mar 2011
School
UTSC
Department
Psychology
Course
PSYB32H3
PSYB32 CHAPTER 7 SUMMARY
-in somatoform disorders, there are physical symptoms for which no biological basis can be found.
The sensory and motor dysfcns of conversion disorder, 1 of 2 principal types of somatoform
disorders, suggest neurological impairments, but ones that do not always make anatomical sense;
they symptoms do, however, seem to serve some psychological purpose. In somatisation disorder,
multiple physical complaints, no adequately explained by physical disorder or injury, lead to freq
visits to physicians, hospitalization, and even unnecessary surgery.
-anxiety plays a role in somatoform disorders, but it is not expressed overtly; instead, it is
transformed into physical symptoms. Theory concerning the etiology of these disorders is
speculative and focuses primarily on conversion disorder. Psychoanalytic theory proposes that in
conversion disorder, repressed impulses are converted into physical symptoms. Behavioural
theories focus on the conscious and deliberate adoption of the symptoms as a means of obtaining
a desired goal. In therapies for somatoform disorders, analysts try to help the client face up to
the repressed impulses, and behavioural treatments attempt to reduce anxiety and reinforce
behaviour that will allow the patient to relinquish the symptoms.
-dissociative disorders are disruptions of consciousness, memory, and identity. An inability to
recall important personal info, usually after some traumatic experience, is diagnosed as
dissociative amnesia. In dissociative fugue, the person moves away, assumes a new identity, and
is amnesic for his or her previous life. In depersonalization disorder, the persons perception of
the self is alters; he/she may experience being outside of the body or changes in the size of body
parts. The person w/DID has 2 or more distinct and fully developed personalities, each w/unique
memories, behaviour patterns, and relationships.
-psychoanalytic theory regards dissociative disorders as instances of massive repression of some
undesirable event or aspect of the self. In DID, the role of abuse in childhood and a high level of
hypnotizability are emerging as imp. Behavioural theories consider dissociative rxns to be
escape responses motivated by high levels of anxiety. Both analytic and behavioural clinicians
focus their treatment efforts on understanding the anxiety associated w/the forgotten memories,
since it is viewed as etiologically significant.
-KEY TERMS
Anaesthesiasbodydysmorphic disorder (BDD)depersonalization disorder
Dissociative amnesia dissociative disordersdissociative fugue factitious
disorder
Dissociative identity disorder (DID)hypochondriasishysteriala bell indifference
Malingering pain disordersomatisation disordersomatoform disorders
www.notesolution.com
Unlock document

This preview shows half of the first page of the document.
Unlock all 1 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in

Document Summary

In somatoform disorders, there are physical symptoms for which no biological basis can be found. The sensory and motor dysfcns of conversion disorder, 1 of 2 principal types of somatoform disorders, suggest neurological impairments, but ones that do not always make anatomical sense; they symptoms do, however, seem to serve some psychological purpose. In somatisation disorder, multiple physical complaints, no adequately explained by physical disorder or injury, lead to freq visits to physicians, hospitalization, and even unnecessary surgery. Anxiety plays a role in somatoform disorders, but it is not expressed overtly; instead, it is transformed into physical symptoms. Theory concerning the etiology of these disorders is speculative and focuses primarily on conversion disorder. Psychoanalytic theory proposes that in conversion disorder, repressed impulses are converted into physical symptoms. Behavioural theories focus on the conscious and deliberate adoption of the symptoms as a means of obtaining a desired goal.