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Chapter 21

Chapter 21: Habit Reversal Procedures

2 Pages
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Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYB45H3
Professor
Zachariah Campbell

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B45: Behaviour Modification
Chapter 21: Habit Reversal Procedures
DEFINING HABIT BEHAVIOURS
Habit reversal- trying to get rid of a habit; include awareness training, competing response training, social
support, generalization strategies and motivational strategies.
Often do not interfere to any great extent with the persons social functioning: they tend to be more of an
annoyance to the person or to significant others in the persons life.
Habit disorder- a repetitive behaviour in one of three categories: nervous, tics or stuttering.
There are 3 types of habit behaviours:
1. NERVOUS HABIT
Nervous habit- repetitive, manipulative behaviours that are most likely to occur when a person
experiences heightened tension.
Ex. Twirling/stroking hair, tapping a pencil, chewing a pen, jingling money in pocket, ripping
paper...
They involve repetitive, manipulative behaviours that are believed to be the most likely to occur when the
person experiences heightened nervous tension.
Competing responses to fix this is to notice when the problem behaviour is happening, and do something
else to refrain from it. Ex. Larry always bites his nails in class, to fix this problem he is told that
whenever he notices he is biting his nails, to stop, and hold his pencil for 1-3 mins (refrain him from
putting it to his mouth)
2. MOTOR AND VOCAL TICS
Motor tics- repetitive, jerking movements of a particular muscle group in the body.
Ex. Moving head around, stretching back, squinting, blinking, eyebrow raising
Believed to be associated with muscle tension
Voc al tic- a repetitive vocal sound or word uttered by an individual that does not serve any
communication function.
Ex. Throat clearing, coughing when person is not sick
A competing response would be, Ex. if Bob always snapped his neck while playing baseball, anytime he
noticed he was doing it, he was told to stop, have his head straight and breath in and out deeply.
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Description
B45: Behaviour Modification Chapter 21: Habit Reversal Procedures DEFINING HABIT BEHAVIOURS Habit reversal- trying to get rid of a habit; include awareness training, competing response training, social support, generalization strategies and motivational strategies. Often do not interfere to any great extent with the persons social functioning: they tend to be more of an annoyance to the person or to significant others in the persons life. Habit disorder- a repetitive behaviour in one of three categories: nervous, tics or stuttering. There are 3 types of habit behaviours: 1. NERVOUS HABIT Nervous habit- repetitive, manipulative behaviours that are most likely to occur when a person experiences heightened tension. Ex. Twirlingstroking hair, tapping a pencil, chewing a pen, jingling money in pocket, ripping paper... They involve repetitive, manipulative behaviours that are believed to be the most likely to occur when the person experiences heightened nervous tension. Competing responses to
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