Textbook Notes (380,777)
CA (168,210)
UTSC (19,296)
Psychology (10,044)
PSYB45H3 (1,085)
Chapter 21

Chapter 21 Summary Guide

7 Pages
91 Views

Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYB45H3
Professor
Zachariah Campbell

This preview shows pages 1-2. Sign up to view the full 7 pages of the document.
CHAPTER 21: HABIT REVERSAL PROCEDURES
Habit reversal procedures: are used to decrease the frequency of undesirable habit
behaviours
Habit behaviours to not interfere greatly with ones social functioning, but rather tend to
be annoying
When the habit behaviour occurs frequently or with high intensity, the person may seek
treatment for the problem
In this case, the habit behaviour is perceived as a habit disorder
Examples of Habit Behaviours
Joel bites his fingernails throughout most of the class
He puts his finger up to his mouth and chews on the edges of his nail
He usually stopped biting a particular nail after it was so short
He was not bothered by his nail-biting behaviour, but his girlfriend was
Defining Habit Behaviours
Three types of habit behaviours are: nervous habits, motor ties, and stuttering
Nervous Habits
Nervous habits: involve repetitive, manipulative behaviours that most likely occur when the
person experiences heightened nervous tension
Example – nail biting, or cracking knuckles
Do not serve any social function for the person (not reinforced)
Serve a self-stimulatory function
Occurs while other voluntary functional activities are occurring
www.notesolution.com
Most cases involve the use of hands or lips
When the frequency or intensity becomes extreme, individuals seek help to eliminate it
Teng et al have used the term body-focused repetitive behaviour problem to refer to
nervous habits
Motor and Vocal Tics
Motor tics: repetitive, jerking movements of a particular muscle group in the body
Usually involve muscles in the neck or face, but can involve the shoulders, arms, legs, or
torso
Example – shoulder-raising, jerking the arm to one side, torso twisting
Associated with heightened muscle tension
Sometimes the development of a tic is due to an injury that increases the tension in a
particular muscle group, but the tic movements continue to occur once the original injury
has passed
Not uncommon for children to develop simple motor ties and then to grow out of them
Vocal tics: repetitive vocal sound that does not serve a social function
Example – throat clearing without a reason
May involve other sounds or words
Tourettes disorder: a tic disorder involving multiple motor & vocal tics
Caused by a complex interaction of genetic & neurological factors and environmental
events
Diagnosed when two or more tics (including at least one vocal tic) occur for at least 1
year
Considered a lifelong disorder with an onset in childhood
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
CHAPTER 21: HABIT REVERSAL PROCEDURES Habit reversal procedures: are used to decrease the frequency of undesirable habit behaviours Habit behaviours to not interfere greatly with ones social functioning, but rather tend to be annoying When the habit behaviour occurs frequently or with high intensity, the person may seek treatment for the problem In this case, the habit behaviour is perceived as a habit disorder Examples of Habit Behaviours Joel bites his fingernails throughout most of the class He puts his finger up to his mouth and chews on the edges of his nail He usually stopped biting a particular nail after it was so short He was not bothered by his nail-biting behaviour, but his girlfriend was Defining Habit Behaviours Three types of habit behaviours are: nervous habits, motor ties, and stuttering Nervous Habits Nervous habits: involve repetitive, manipulative behaviours that most likely occur when the person experiences heightened nervous tension Example nail biting, or cracking knuckles Do not serve any social function for the person (not reinforced) Serve a self-stimulatory function Occurs while other voluntary functional activities are occurring www.notesolution.com
More Less
Unlock Document


Only pages 1-2 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit