PSYC12H3 Chapter Notes - Chapter 9: Realistic Conflict Theory, Contact Hypothesis, Ingroups And Outgroups

24 views4 pages
Published on 18 Apr 2013
School
UTSC
Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC12H3
Chapter 9: Reducing Prejudice (p. 240-262)
- People tend to make assumptions about groups with which they have little contact, or about
which they have little knowledge about.
Contact hypothesis: the notion that bringing two outgroups together in a situation will result in
decreased prejudice and stereotyping.
- Research indicates that in many situations of mere contact, roughly 50% of the interactions felt
more positive about the outgroup, but about 50% of the time, people felt more negative toward
the outgroup.
Allport specified four fundamental criteria for positive intergroup contact to occur:
1. Equal-status members
2. Common goals
3. Intergroup cooperation
4. Support of legitimate authority
Pettigrew’s Reformulated Contact Theory
- Decategorization: when people begin to see each other in terms of their personalities and
characteristics rather than their group membership.
- By individuating members of the outgroup, one realizes they are unique and comparable to one’s
ingroup.
- Recategorization: the intergroup context is configured to encourage a breakdown of “us” versus
“them” distinct categories, and to form broader “we” category by making members of both
groups see they have more in common
- Pettigrew’s reformulation of the contact situation is a promising model.
SHERIFF’S ROBBER’S CAVE STUDY: THE SUPERORDINATE GOAL
- Relating back to the boys camp experiment
- When two groups completed for scarce resources, prejudice and stereotypes between the two
groups will result.
Robber’s Cave study: Sheriff’s classic study that found support for the realistic-conflict theory and that
also demonstrated how giving prejudiced groups a superordinate goal can greatly reduce prejudice by
blurring the lines between ingroup and outgroup membership.
Unlock document

This preview shows page 1 of the document.
Unlock all 4 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in

Document Summary

People tend to make assumptions about groups with which they have little contact, or about which they have little knowledge about. Contact hypothesis: the notion that bringing two outgroups together in a situation will result in decreased prejudice and stereotyping. Research indicates that in many situations of mere contact, roughly 50% of the interactions felt more positive about the outgroup, but about 50% of the time, people felt more negative toward the outgroup. Allport specified four fundamental criteria for positive intergroup contact to occur: equal-status members, common goals, intergroup cooperation, support of legitimate authority. Decategorization: when people begin to see each other in terms of their personalities and characteristics rather than their group membership. By individuating members of the outgroup, one realizes they are unique and comparable to one"s ingroup. Recategorization: the intergroup context is configured to encourage a breakdown of us versus.

Get OneClass Grade+

Unlimited access to all notes and study guides.

YearlyMost Popular
75% OFF
$9.98/m
Monthly
$39.98/m
Single doc
$39.98

or

You will be charged $119.76 upfront and auto renewed at the end of each cycle. You may cancel anytime under Payment Settings. For more information, see our Terms and Privacy.
Payments are encrypted using 256-bit SSL. Powered by Stripe.