Textbook Notes (380,713)
CA (168,179)
UTSC (19,290)
Psychology (10,038)
PSYC18H3 (280)
Chapter 2

Chapter 2 notes

2 Pages
59 Views

Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYC18H3
Professor
Gerald Cupchik

This preview shows half of the first page. Sign up to view the full 2 pages of the document.
Chapter 2: approaches to understanding emotions
Charles Darwin
Humans are descended from other species: we are not only closer to animals than had been
thought, but we ourselves are animals.
Observed emotional expressions in nonhuman species, as well as in adult and infant humans
(normal and abnormal)
One of the first to use questionnaires
One of the first to use photographs of naturalistic and posed expressions to make scientific points
2 questions that guide emotion researchers today
How are emotions expression in humans and other animals?
Where do our emotions come from?
Concluded that emotional expressions derive largely from habits that in our evolutionary or
individual past had once been useful. These are based on reflex like mechanisms. Some actions
occur in modern humans whether they are useful or not, and are triggered involuntarily in
circumstances analogous to those that had triggered the original habits
Emotional expressions showed the continuity of adult human behavioural mechanisms with those
of lower animals and with those of infancy
He thought emotional expressions were like vestigial parts of our bodies.
Darwin suggested that patterns of adult affection, of taking those whom we love in our arms, are
based on patterns of parents hugging young infants.
Emotions links us to our past, both to the past of our species and to our own infancy
Movements of expression in the face and body, are of much importance for our welfare
Serve as the first means of communication between the mother and her infant; she smiles
approval, and thus encourages her child on the right path, or frowns disapproval. We readily
perceive sympathy in others by their expression
William James
When we perceive the object of fear, a bear, the exciting fact as he put it, then the emotion is the
perception of changes of our body as we react to that fact.
What we feel is our heart beating, our skin cold, our posture frozen, or our legs carrying us
away as fast as possible
The core of an emotion is the pattern of bodily responses
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
Chapter 2: approaches to understanding emotions Charles Darwin Humans are descended from other species: we are not only closer to animals than had been thought, but we ourselves are animals. Observed emotional expressions in nonhuman species, as well as in adult and infant humans (normal and abnormal) One of the first to use questionnaires One of the first to use photographs of naturalistic and posed expressions to make scientific points 2 questions that guide emotion researchers today How are emotions expression in humans and other animals? Where do our emotions come from? Concluded that emotional expressions derive largely from habits that in our evolutionary or individual past had once been useful. These are based on reflex like mechanisms. Some actions occur in modern humans whether they are useful or not, and are triggered involuntarily in circumstances analogous to those that had triggered the original habits Emotional expressions showed the continuity of adult human behavioural mechanisms with those of lower animals and with those
More Less
Unlock Document


Only half of the first page are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit