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Chapter 13

Chapter 13 notes

11 Pages
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Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYC37H3
Professor
Bouffard

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Chapter 14 Projective Personality Tests
Psychologists conduct assessments, in which tests are used in conjunction with
historical data, face-to-face contact, interview procedures and experience to test
hypotheses about individuals
Projective tests (like the Rorschach inkblot) are the most controversial and most
misunderstood psychological tests
Between 1996 and 2007, Rorschach was used the most
oIt ranked 3rd to MMPI/MMPI-2 and the NEO in the number of research
citations
THE PROJECTIVE HYPOTHESIS
Projective hypothesis: when people try to understand something (stimulus) and
make their own interpretations to understand what it is
oExample in a dark room, child sees shadow and think its a monster its
just a shadow that is neutral its a reflection of the inner workings of his
mind
Leonardo da Vinci used ambiguous figures to evaluate young art students art was
students imagination
Shakespeares nothing is either good or bad, bethinking makes it so.
What the person sees in a stimulus is a reflection of their personal qualities or
characteristics
Problem with all projective tests is that many factors can influence ones response to
them
Validity is questioned often
THE RORSCAHCH INKBLOT TEST
Historical Antecedents
Individuals report idiosyncratic or unique personal meanings when viewing inkblot
stimuli
Theres a wide variety of possible responses
Binet proposed the inkblot idea when Rorschach was only 10 years old
www.notesolution.com
oResearchers supported this and there was a publication of the first set of a
standardized inkblots by Whipple (1910)
Rorschach is known for it because he came up with the importance of the test 
which is to identify psychological disorders
oHis book psychodiognostik
David levy brought the Rorschach test to the united states from Europe he got a
cold and unenthusiastic response
o5 individuals played a dominant role in the use and investigation of the
Rorschach test
Samuel J. Beck studying configurational tendencies in Rorschach
responses
Beck, hertz, Klopfer, Piotrowski, Rapaport
They all developed their own systems of administration, scoring
and interpretation
Stimuli, Administration, and Interpretation
Created by dropping into a piece of paper and folding it
He selected 20
Test publisher only paid for 10
o5 black and grey, 2 had black, grey and red, and 3 had pastel colours of
various shades
Individual test
Examiners cannot give any information about what it might be but they do
sometimes influence through facial expressions or nonverbal communication
oRapaport made examiner sit next to subject rather than face-to-face
Lack of clear structure or direction is a primary feature of projective tests
each card is administered twice
www.notesolution.com
the first phase is free-association phase of the test and that is when the examiner
shows the cards one at a time and will attempt to prompt an answer most people
see more than one thing here
records everything said by the individual
ohow long it takes a subject to respond to a card (reaction time) and the
position of the card when the response is made (upside down, sideways)
the second phase, the inquiry the examiner will show the cards again and scores
the subjects response
responses are scored in 5 ways
1)location where the perception was seen
2)determinant what determined the response
3)form quality to what extent the response matched the stimulus
properties of the inkblot
4)content what the perception was
5)frequency of occurrence was the response original or popular (same
thing said for 1 out of 3 people)
location chart in order to determine the location of what they saw
owhole blot (W), common detail (D), or an unusual detail (Dd)
oconfabulatory response (DW) subject over generalizes from a part to the
whole
determines number and percentage of W, D, and Dd responses
osummarized as a frequency or percentage and is known as the quantitative
structural, or statistical aspect of the Rorschach as opposed to the qualitative
onormal subjects have a balance of W, D, and Dd response and if not, then
examiner suspects a problem
othe typical or norm may have problems or deviate
osubject may have perceptual problem because of brain damage or severe
emotional problems
www.notesolution.com

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Description
Chapter 14 Projective Personality Tests Psychologists conduct assessments, in which tests are used in conjunction with historical data, face-to-face contact, interview procedures and experience to test hypotheses about individuals Projective tests (like the Rorschach inkblot) are the most controversial and most misunderstood psychological tests Between 1996 and 2007, Rorschach was used the most rd o It ranked 3 to MMPIMMPI-2 and the NEO in the number of research citations THE PROJECTIVE HYPOTHESIS Projective hypothesis: when people try to understand something (stimulus) and make their own interpretations to understand what it is o Example in a dark room, child sees shadow and think its a monster its just a shadow that is neutral its a reflection of the inner workings of his mind Leonardo da Vinci used ambiguous figures to evaluate young art stud eatrt was students imagination Shakespeares nothing is either good or bad, bethinking makes it so. What the person sees in a stimulus is a reflection of their personal qualities or characteristics Problem with all projective tests is that many factors can influence ones response to them Validity is questioned often THE RORSCAHCH INKBLOT TEST Historical Antecedents Individuals report idiosyncratic or unique personal meanings when viewing inkblot stimuli Theres a wide variety of possible responses Binet proposed the inkblot idea when Rorschach was only 10 years old www.notesolution.com o Researchers supported this and there was a publication of the first set of a standardized inkblots by Whipple (1910) Rorschach is known for it because he came up with the importance of th etest which is to identify psychological disorders o His book psychodiognostik David levy brought the Rorschach test to the united states from Eu rope got a cold and unenthusiastic response o 5 individuals played a dominant role in the use and investigation of the Rorschach test Samuel J. Beck studying configurational tendencies in Rorschach responses Beck, hertz, Klopfer, Piotrowski, Rapaport They all developed their own systems of administration, scoring and interpretation Stimuli, Administration, and Interpretation Created by dropping into a piece of paper and folding it He selected 20 Test publisher only paid for 10 o 5 black and grey, 2 had black, grey and red, and 3 had pastel colours of various shades Individual test Examiners cannot give any information about what it might be but they do sometimes influence through facial expressions or nonverbal communication o Rapaport made examiner sit next to subject rather than face-to-face Lack of clear structure or direction is a primary feature of projective tests each card is administered twice www.notesolution.com
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