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Chapter 16

Chapter 16 notes

9 Pages
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Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYC37H3
Professor
Bouffard

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Chapter 16 Testing in Counselling Psychology
MEASURING INTERESTS
You want the right career, you must identify your interests
Interest inventories help make choices by providing feedback
First interest inventory, introduced in 1921, was called the Carnegie Interest
Inventory
Two most widely used interests tests: Strong Vocational Interest Blank in
1927 and the Kuder Preference Survey in 1939
Today more than 80 interest inventories
The Strong Vocational Interest Bank
After world war I
E.K. strong, Jr. and colleagues
oFound that people in different professional groups had different
patterns of interest
oWanted to develop a test that would match the interests of a subject to
the interests and values of a criterion group of people who were happy
in the careers they had chosen
This is called criterion keying, or the criterion-group approach
Then called it the Strong Vocational Interest Blank (SVIB)
oRespond to 400 items about likes and dislikes related to the
occupations and leisure activities
oCriterion keying determined how the interests of new subjects
resembled those of the criterion groups
Revised version 1966
www.notesolution.com
o399 items were related to 54 occupations for men
oSeparate form with 32 occupations for women
oHow frequently an interest occurred in an occupational group
oNormative sample of 300 people
oOdd-even and short-term test-retest figures from low .80s to low .90s
oLong-term test-retest was .60s
oValidity showed that SVIB predicted job satisfaction
oStudied university students from Stanford university in 1930s and
checked on them 22 years later and majority of them remained
consistent with their interests
Interest patterns are fairly well established by age 17
Stopped using it around 1960s and early 1970s
Critics said there was a gender bias in the scales because there were different
tests for men and women
Others said a lack of theory associated with the test
The Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory
D. P. Campbell published the new version of the SVIB
He called it the Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory (SCII)
It was to make up for the shortcomings of the SVIB
The forms for men and women were combined into a single form in order to
avoid gender bias
The scales for water and waitress were merged example
Campbell became interested in Hollands theory of vocational choice which
was a six personality factors
www.notesolution.com
oHolland said that interests express personality and that people can be
classified into one or more of six categories according to their interests
oThese 6 personality factors were not gender biased
oCampbell established a theoretical basis for the test that the SVIB
lacked
325 items and a person responds like, dislike, or indifferent
Automated scoring services for the SCII and summarize several scores for
each profile
oFirst score is a summary of general themes based on Hollands six
personality types
oSecond score summary is to ensure that errors were not made in the
administration, scoring, or processing of the test
oThird set of scores is about the persons basic interests
Example did the person score high, low, or average in preference
for science, mechanical activities, and athletics
oFinal set of summary scores is for the occupational scales
Shows a persons scores for each of 124 occupations which are
broken into 6 general occupational themes
Test takers scores are compared with the scores of people
working in the various professions
Test takers scores on the basic interest scale and general theme
scale is compared with those of people in general
If your degree of similarity between your interest and the
interests of people happy in their chosen occupations
Not used very much anymore
Last released in spring 1985
www.notesolution.com

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Description
Chapter 16 Testing in Counselling Psychology MEASURING INTERESTS You want the right career, you must identify your interests Interest inventories help make choices by providing feedback First interest inventory, introduced in 1921, was called the Carnegie Interest Inventory Two most widely used interests tests: Strong Vocational Interest Blank in 1927 and the Kuder Preference Survey in 1939 Today more than 80 interest inventories The Strong Vocational Interest Bank After world war I E.K. strong, Jr. and colleagues o Found that people in different professional groups had different patterns of interest o Wanted to develop a test that would match the interests of a subject to the interests and values of a criterion group of people who were happy in the careers they had chosen This is called criterion keying, or the criterion-group approach Then called it the Strong Vocational Interest Blank (SVIB) o Respond to 400 items about likes and dislikes related to the occupations and leisure activities o Criterion keying determined how the interests of new subjects resembled those of the criterion groups Revised version 1966 www.notesolution.com
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