Textbook Notes (368,528)
Canada (161,957)
Psychology (9,695)
PSYA02H3 (961)
Chapter 9

Intelligence- chapter 9- text book.docx

10 Pages
66 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYA02H3
Professor
Elizabeth Page- Gould
Semester
Summer

Description
Intelligence, Aptitude, and Cognitive Abilities  01/08/2014 9.1 Intelligence= the ability to think, understand, and reason, and cognitively adapt to and overcome  obstacles  Achievement Tests= measure knowledge and thinking skills that an individual has acquired Aptitude Tests= are designed to measure an individuals potential to perform well on a specific range of  tests ­Constructing questionnaires and tests fall under a branch of psychology known as psychometrics, the  measurement of psychological traits and abilities­ including personality, attitude, and intelligence  Validity= the degree to which a test actually measures the trait or ability it is intended to measure  Predictive Validity= the degree to which a test predicts future performance  Reliability= the measurement of the degree to which a test produces consistent results ▯a method of evaluating reliability= test­ retest reliability  ▯ In the same way that you depend on on a reliable car to always start, a psychologist should be able to  rely on a test to produce consistent scores ▯Those who take the SAT for the second time usually increase their score a small amount, this increase  isn’t due to changes in intelligence, therefore the SAT is not a perfectly reliable test  Standardized Test= a test that has a set of question or problems that are administered and scored in  a uniform way across large numbers of individuals  ▯ standardization allows for comparisons  Norms= statistics that allow individuals to be evaluated relative to a typical or standard score  ▯ Another statistic called the standard deviation measures variability around a mean ▯in intelligence tests, this can be interpreted as the typical number of points between an individuals score  and the mean score  ▯the standard deviation is though of as the average distance away from the average Percentile Rank= the percentage of scores below a certain point  Ex­ a score of 100 has a percentile rank of .50 meaning that 50% of the population scores below this level ­A norm is established by giving the test to hundreds of people and then calculating the mean and the  standard deviation ­French government created the Commission on the Education of Retarded Children. Alfred Binet and  Theodore Simon developed a method of assessing children’s academic achievement at school ▯Binet and Simon’s work resulted in an achievement test­ a measure of how well a child performed at  various cognitive tasks relative to other children of his age  ▯the test measured  mental age= the average or typical test score for a specific chronological age,  ▯a 7 year old child with a mental age of 7 would be considered average because her mental age matches  her chronological age  Terman and other described the  Stanford­ Binet test= a test intended to measure innate (genetic)  intelligence  William Stern developed the intelligence quotient (IQ)­ a measurement in which the mental age of  an individual is divided by the persons chronological age and then multiplied by 100  Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scare (WAIs)= the most commonly used intelligence test used on  adolescents  ▯ the WAIS provides a single IQ score for each test taker­ the full scale IQ­ but breaks intelligence into a  General Ability Index (GAI) and a Cognitive Proficiency Index (CPI)  ▯ The GAI is computed from scores on the Verbal Comprehensions and Perceptual Reasoning indices.  These measures tap into an individual’s intellectual abilities without placing so much emphasis on how fast  he can sole problems and make decisions ▯ The CPI is based on Working Memory and Processing Speed subtests  John Raved developed Raven’s Progressive Matrices: An intelligence test that emphasizes  problems that are intended not to be bound to a particular language or culture  Deductive Reasoning= identifying and extracting important information Reproductive Reasoning= applying it to new situations  Charles Darwin had a cousin= Galton ▯Galton explained their eminence by good breeding­ he believed they were genetically gifted. Of course,  the children were raised with a great deal of privilege, good nutrition, fine schools, and plenty of parental  attention­ but Galton discounted an influence these factors might have on intelligence and achievement  Anthropometrics= “the measurement of people” the method of measuring physical and mental  variation in humans  ­Working memory capacity is an expression of intelligence because it allows complex reasoning strategies  to be used in short term storage. Alternatively working memory processes help us ignore irrelevant and  distracting information, which allows for intelligent behavior to emerge ▯working memory tasks seem to tap into abilities that allow us to solve problems and express out mental  abilities  ­We can search within the brain to identify which characteristics may account for intelligence  Sandra Witelson collected 100 brains ▯Detailed anatomical examinations and size measurements were made on the entire brain and sub regions   that support cognitive skulls. Approximately 36% of the variation in verbal intelligence scores was  accounted for by the size of the cortex ▯One of the most obvious features of the human brain is its convulated surface. These convolutions  comprise the outer part of the cerebral cortex. The number and size of these cerebral gyri is greater in  species that have complex cognitive and social lives, such as elephants, dolphins, and primates    ▯Increased convolutions are associate with higher intelligence test scores  ▯Brain size and IQ are influenced by factors like nutrition and physical health  ­Anorexia nervosa or prolonged periods of alcohol abuse appear to lose brain mass along with a certain  cognitive skulls such as the ability to put together block designs in a standardized test ▯Brain volume gradually declines as a result of aging; this effect is also correlated with declines in some but   not all measures of intelligence  9.2: ­Factor Analysis= a statistical technique that reveals similarities among a wide variety of items ▯ex­ different measures such as vocabulary, reading, comprehension, and verbal reasoning  ­General Intelligence= a concept that intelligence is a basic cognitive trait comprising the ability to  learn, reason and solve problems regardless of their nature  ­If human intelligence really is a general ability, then that would certainly explain Spearman’s correlational  findings: A person with a high g score could use his general intelligence to solve problems in any domain  he choose ­Fluid Intelligence(Gf)= a type of intelligence that is used to adapt to new situations and solve new  problems without relying on previous knowledge ­Crystallized Intelligence(Gc)= is a form of intelligence that relies on extensive experience and  knowledge and therefore tends to be relatively stable and robust  ▯performance in tasks that require Gf intelligence peaks in early to middle adulthood and declines later in  life ▯Gc involves accumulated knowledge. Thus as long as an individual keeps learning new information, Gc is  less likely to decrease  ­L.L.Thurstone examined scores of general intelligenc
More Less

Related notes for PSYA02H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit