Textbook Notes (367,976)
Canada (161,540)
Psychology (9,695)
PSYA02H3 (961)
Chapter 11

Chapter 11 – Motivation and Emotion
Premium

7 Pages
105 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYA02H3
Professor
Steve Joordens
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 11 – Motivation and Emotion Motivation – Concerns physiological and psychological processes underlying the initiation of  behaviors that direct organisms to specific goals. Homeostasis – The body’s physiological processes that allows it to maintain consistent internal  states in response to the environment. Drives – Physiological triggers that tell us that we are deprived of something and cause us to  seek it out (ex. Food) Incentives – (or goals) Stimuli we seek to reduce drives. ▯ Physiological Aspects of Hunger Satiation – The point in a meal where we are no longer motivated to eat. ­ “On” and “off” switch involved in hunger. ­ “On switch”, lateral hypothalamus ­ “Off switch”, ventromedial hypothalamus ­ Lateral hypothalamus stimulated by electricity in rats caused them to start eating. ▯ Psychological Aspects of Hunger ­ In some situations food can be a more powerful reinforce than highly addictive drugs. ­ “Sugar fix” imply that an addiction to candy bars is comparable to an addiction to drugs. ­ Taste is a powerful force behind motivation to eat. ▯ Tastes, Texture, and Eating ­ If the only factors in our motivation to eat were for calories and essential nutrients a few simple  foods would be consumed daily. ­ Taste and variety motivate decisions about what to eat. ­ Most popular foods are the most dietary fat and sugar. ­ We crave fats because we have receptors on the tongue that are sensitive to fat content  of food. ­ Fatty foods stimulate the pleasure sensing area of the brain. ­ Touch receptors in the mouth detect textures of the food and relay information to the orbitofrontal  cortex. ▯ Food Variety and Eating ­ Bottomless Bowl of soup. ­ Volunteers asked to eat soup until they were full. ­ Tube refilled bowl unknowingly to the volunteers. ­ Stopped consuming on average over 70% more than participants     that knowingly refilled their bowl. ­ They did not feel more satiated or believe that they had eaten    more than the other participants. Unit Bias – The tendency to assume that the unit of proportion is an appropriate amount to  consume. ▯ Eating and Social Context ­ Eating is more than just a physical drive; there are social motives as well. ­ The presence of other people can either increase or decrease consumption of food. ­ Depends on the situation. 1) Social facilitation: Eating more – Hosts may encourage you to eat two or three  servings. 2) Impression management: Eating less – Sometime people are self conscious  and control their behavior so that others will see them in a certain way. 3) Modeling: Eating whatever they eat – See others as a “model” and eat whatever  they eat restraining their eating. ▯ Eating Disorder  Obesity – Positive balance of energy, energy intake exceeds energy expenditure. ­ Weight­loss difficult, drive to eat and incentive value of food increase when deprived of it. ­ Obese people have higher metabolic activity in regions of the brain that respond to sensations in  the mouth, tongue and lips. Anorexia Nervosa – Eating disorder that involves 1) Self starvation 2) fear of weight gain and  distorted view of self 3) denial of serious consequences of low weight. Bulimia Nervosa ­ Eating disorder that is characterized by periods of food deprivation, binge  eating, and purging. ­ Males less prone to these problems. ▯ Sexual Motivation Libido ­ The motivation for sexual activity and pleasure. ­ Generally believed that men are more interested in sex than women. ▯ Human Sexual behavior: Psychological and Biological Influences ­ Sex frequently without an end goal of reproduction. ­ Sex for reasons other than reproduction rare in non­human species. ­ Bonobos and dolphins have sex for no reason. ▯ Psychological Measures of Sexual Motivation ­ Alfred Kinsey ­ 37% of the men he interviewed had at least one homosexual experience resulting in orgasm. ­  Only 13% in females. ­ Published his finding in what it known as “Kinsey reports”. ­ Questionnaire method of studying sexual motivation has continued. Common reasons to have sex: 1) For physical reasons 2) To attain a goal. a. To get a raise. 3) For emotional reasons 4) Because of insecurity a. Felt obligated to ▯ Biological Measures of Sex  Sexual Response Cycle – Describes the phases of physiological change during sexual  activity. 1) Excitement 2) Plateau 3) Orgasm 4) Resolution ­ Applies to both females and males. ­ There are differences between sexes in how stages are experienced and their duration. Refractory Period – A time period during which erection and orgasm are not physically  possible. ▯ Sexual Dysfunction Erectile Dysfunction (ED) – In males. The inability to maintain or achieve an erection. ­ Viagra enhances 
More Less

Related notes for PSYA02H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit