Textbook Notes (368,665)
Canada (162,054)
Psychology (9,696)
PSYB01H3 (581)
Anna Nagy (283)
Chapter 6

Chapter 6 - Observational Methods.docx

4 Pages
91 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYB01H3
Professor
Anna Nagy
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 6  Observational Methods  LO1 – Compare quantitative and qualitative approaches to investigating behaviour LO2 – Describe naturalistic observation and discuss methodological issues such as participation and  concealment LO3 – Describe systemic observation and discuss methodological issues such as the use of coding systems,  reactivity, equipment, reliability, and sampling LO4 – Describe the features of and appropriate uses for a case study LO5 – Describe archival research and sources of archival data: statistical records, survey archives, and  written records  (LO1)  QUANTITATIVE  & Q UALITATIVE  APPROACHES    Quantitative Approach  ▯ (empirical) an approach to research that emphasizes scientific empiricism in  design, data collection, and statistical analyses  • Numerical values are assigned to responses, and requires statistical analysis Qualitative Approach  ▯ (interpretative) a set of approaches to research that emphasizes people’s lived  experiences in their own words, and the researcher’s interpretation of those experiences  • Interpreting people’s experiences within a specific context  Both quantitative and qualitative methods may be used  ▯ex. Teen employment: a quantitative study might  examine archival data collected form Statistics Canada; a qualitative study could examine concealed  naturalistic observations while working in a fast­food restaurant as a manager trainee  (LO2)  NATURALISTIC  O BSERVATION   Naturalistic Observation  ▯ descriptive method in which observations are made in a natural social setting  (sometimes called field observation) • This research method has roots in anthropology and the study of animal behaviour and is used in  the social sciences to study many phenomena in all types of social and organizational settings • Often used with a qualitative approach (although used for quantitative purposes too  ▯to generate  hypotheses for later experiments) • Researchers use naturalistic observation when they want to describe and understand how people in  a social or cultural setting live, work, and experience the setting Description and Interpretation of Data • Naturalistic observation requires that researchers immerse themselves in the situation  • Researcher must keep detailed field notes  ▯write or dictate everything that has happened at least  once each day • Qualitative field researchers use a variety of techniques to gather information: o Observing people and events o Interviewing key “informants” to provide inside information o Talking to people about their lives o Examining documents produced in the setting (i.e. newspapers, newsletters, memos) o Audio and video recordings • The first goal of a researcher is to describe the setting, events, and persons observed • The second goal is to interpret what was observed o May involve identifying common themes or developing a theory with hypotheses for  future work  • The final report might reflect the chronological order of events (as in the narrative approach) or  can be organized around the theory developed by the researcher (as in grounded theory) Chapter 6  Observational Methods  • A good naturalistic observation report will support the validity (i.e. accuracy) of the interpretation  by using multiple confirmations  • Naturalistic observation tends to be used by researchers using a qualitative approach o Data from naturalistic observation studies are primarily qualitative descriptions of the  observations themselves rather than quantitative statistical summaries  • Quantitative data may also be gathered in a naturalistic observation study  • A researcher using a mixed approach might report and interpret quantitative data (ex. family  income levels) along with qualitative data gathered from interviews and direct observations  Issues in Naturalistic Observation • Participation and Concealment  ▯ two issues facing researchers are whether to be participant or  nonparticipant in the social setting and whether to conceal their purposes from other people in the  setting  o A nonparticipant observer is an outsider who does not become an active part of the  setting – a participant observer assumes an active, insider role  o Participant observation  ▯ a type of naturalistic observation in which the researcher  assumes a role in the setting he/she is researching. The researcher’s participation may or  may not be concealed   A potential problem with participant observation is that the observer may lose  the objectivity necessary to conduct scientific observation  o Concealed observation  ▯ a type of naturalistic observation in which the researcher  assumes a participant role in the setting he/she is researching, but conceals the purpose  of the research  May be preferable because the presence of the observer may influence and alter  the behaviour of those being observed  • But this can subside quickly as people grow used to the observer and  behave naturally eventually  Less reactive than non­concealed because people are not aware that their  behaviours are being observed and recorded   May pose ethical issues  o There are degrees of participation and concealment, researchers must carefully determine  what their role in the setting will be  • Defining the Scope of the Observation  ▯researcher employing naturalistic observation may want   to study everything about a setting, but this may not be possible, simply because a setting and the  questions one might ask about is are complex.  o Therefore, researchers must limit the scope of their observations to behaviours that are  relevant to the central issues of the study  • Limits of Naturalistic Observation  ▯from a qualitative perspective, the approach is most useful  when investigating complex social settings both to understand the settings and to develop theories  based on the observations. From a quantitative perspective, it is useful for fathering data in real­ life settings and generating hypotheses for later experiments.  o The inability to control the setting makes it challenging to test well­defined 
More Less

Related notes for PSYB01H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit