Textbook Notes (368,098)
Canada (161,641)
Psychology (9,695)
PSYB32H3 (1,174)
Chapter 1

Chapter 1.docx

7 Pages
50 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYB32H3
Professor
Diane Mangalindan
Semester
Fall

Description
Developmental Psychology­ chapter 1 1. Introduction ­ Child development (definition) identifies and describes change in child  cognitive, emotional, motor, and social capacities. Through moments of  conception through periods of adolescence.  ­ Charles Darwin conducted research on childrens sensory capabilities,  demonstrating that ppl could do research on children.  2. Themes of Developments Origins of Behaviour: biological vs. Environmental ­ Most cont. theorists recognize that both have an influence. The importance of  each varies.  ­ Arnold Gesell believed strictly in biological. He concentrated on maturation  (definition) or “the natural unfolding of development”  ­ John B. Watson believed strictly in environmental. He claimed that by  organizing an environment a certain way you could create a genius or a  criminal.  ­ Modern studies focus on the interaction between the two (e.g. Research on  child maltreatment. Children with genetic predisposition are more likely to  have behaviour problems than others that do not. When they live in an abusive  home, it puts a child at risk).  ­ Peers, parents, etc. don’t shape the child. The child is active in their  environment (e.g. Child cries to get attention).  Pattern of Developmental Change: Continuity vs. discontinuity ­ Continuous: each event builds on earlier experiences (smooth and gradual,  quantitative/cumulative). ­ Discontinuous: abrupt changes (e.g. Swimming skills, walking. Qualitative) ­ Contemporary view: see it as continuous, but interspersed with point of  discontinuous change.  Forces That Affect Developmental Change: Individual Characteristics Vs. Contextual  (situational) and Cultural Influences ­ Contemporary view: interactionist's view. (E.g. Children seek out  environments that follow with their genes and personality. Aggressive  predisposition may lead child to find a gang or a club where they can be  aggressive).    Risks To Healthy Development and Individual Resilience:  ­ How different children respond when confronted with situational  challenges or risks to healthy development (biological [illness, genes]  or environmental [family income, marital conflict at home]) Many seem to suffer permanent disruption’s, others show sleeper  effects (cope well initially, but then have problems later on), some  exhibit resilience; some children deal with risk better in the future after  gaining experience.   Researching Across Cultures:  differences in child development  between different cultures shows variation in human potential and  expression that may emerge/not emerge in certain circumstances and at  different points in their lives. Then there are cultures that consist of  many different subcultures. (E.g. Canada. Many different cultures and  languages. 2 languages being the dominant) 3. Theoretical Perspectives On Development Structural­organismic Perspectives (structuralism) ­ Freud focussed on emotion and personality ­ Piaget focussed on thinking ­ Biology, evolutionary ­ An organism goes through n organized structured series of stages  (discontinuous stages). These stages were seen as universal  Psychodynamic Theory: emphasizes how the experiences of early  childhood shape the adult personality ­ Personality consists of 3 parts id, ego, and superego. The infant is  controlled by the id (instinctive drives), which becomes more  controlled by the ego (rational and reality bound, through socially  appropriate behaviour), then the superego develops (child internalizes  parental and societal morals, values and roles), which in turn the child  develops a conscience (apply moral values to their own acts).  (Table  1­1, pg.11) ­ One of Freud’s contributions is emphasis on how the first 6 years  affects the later development.  ­ Erik Erikson came up with psychosocial theory of human  development. Consists of 8 stages, characterized by personal or social  task the person must accomplish, and risks if she doesn’t. (Table 1­1,  pg. 11).   Piagetian Theory: Uses organization (biology) and adaptation to  describe intellectual development.  ­ Organization: human intellectual dev. is biologically organized and  changes in an organized way.  ­ Adaptation: the process where intellectual changes occur and the  human mind becomes adapted to the world.  ­ Four stages (discontinuous or qualitative):  1) Infant – rely on sensory and motor abilities to learn,  2) Preschool – rely on mental structures and symbols (language),  3) School years­ start to rely more on logic,  4) Adolescence­ reason about abstract ideas. ­ Cognitive dev. For child turns from self centered immediate sensory  satiation to more complex multifaceted abstract understanding of the  world.  Learning Perspectives (the process of learning) ­ Behaviourism: roth of experience, gradual, cont. view. Through the lifetime.   ­ In the early 20  C. John B. Watson used Pavlov’s classic conditioning to  explain children’s behaviour (e.g. Fear. He conditioned an 11 m old infant to  fear furry animals by showing the baby a white rat and making a loud noise  that scared the baby).   B.F. Skinners notion of operant conditioning (dependent on the  consequences of behaviour). (+) Reinforcement was a treat or praise to  increase likelihood that the child would repeat the behaviour.  Punishment in the form of criticism, withdrawal of privileges can  decrease chance of repeated behaviour.   Cognitive social learning theory: children not only learn through  classical and operant conditioning but also through observation and  imitation.  ­ Albert bandura: showed that children exposed to an aggressive  behaviour would copy it (e.g. Bobo doll).   ­ Four cognitive processes govern how well a child will learn from  imitation: 1) the child mist attend to models behaviour.  2) Child must  retain behaviour in memory. 3) Must have capacity, physically and  intellectually to reproduce the behaviour. 4) Child must be motivates  or have reason to reproduce it. (Figure 1­2, pg. 13).     Information­ processing approaches: flow of info through cognitive  systems, very sim. To how computers process info.  ­ Output may be in the form of an action, decisions, or a memory that is  stored for later use.  ­ The child attends to info, changes it into mental or cognitive  representation, stores it in memory, compares it to other memories,  generates various responses, makes a decision about the most  appropriate response, and then takes specific action.  Dynamic systems perspective ­ Individuals and their achievements can be understood and interpreted within  the framework of the interacting components of the system.  ­ How the child functions in society. E.g. Learning the skill of walking. Infants  must coordinate physical abilities (muscle strength, balance, momentum),  with the physical world (gravity, properties of surface) and only when they are  all mastered can the child walk. ­ Child within a social system.  ­ It is the ensemble of components that is important not the order of their  development.  Contextual Perspectives o Sociocultural theory: focus is on social and cultural experience on dev.  ­ Lev s. Vygotsky ­ Social interaction is seen as a critical force in dev.  ­ With assistance from others in the child’s social environment, they learn to  function intellectually on their own.  ­ E.g. Peer tutoring.  ­ How children think, work together and use cultural tools to help children  function and solve problems within society (e.g. Language, math sysbols,  technology).  o Bronfenbrenner’s ecological theory ­ There is an importance between the relationships of the organism and  environmental systems, and also between two environmental systems.  ­ Urie Bronfenbrenner ­ Framework that describes layers that in turn all affect the child’s development.  (Figure 1­3).  ­ Microsystem: child interacts with ppl and institutions closest to them.  ­ Mesosystem: parents, teachers, school system, family, peers.  ­ Exosystem: indirect influence on childs development. (E.g. Parents work).  ­ Macro system: ideology of a culture or subculture ­ Chronosystem: these four systems change all the time, which he calls  chronosystem. Individual change (puberty, severe illness), external change  (parents divorce, birth of sibling, war). o The lifespan
More Less

Related notes for PSYB32H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit