Textbook Notes (368,399)
Canada (161,862)
Psychology (9,695)
PSYB45H3 (1,081)
Jessica Dere (593)
Chapter 19

CHAPTER 19 – ANTECEDENT CONTROL.docx

4 Pages
47 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYB45H3
Professor
Jessica Dere
Semester
Winter

Description
CHAPTER 19 – ANTECEDENT CONTROL: MOTIVATION COACH DAWSON’S MOTIVATION PROGRAM • Started a points program called “Eagle effort”, in which players could earn points for good performance in lay-up drills, etc. • At the end of the term, the most increase in points for effort occurred in the “positive attitudes” category A TRADITIONAL VIEW OF MOTIVATION • The traditional view of motivation is “an inner drive that causes a person to act a certain way” • A logical problem with this view is that it involves circular reasoning. The inner thing is usually inferred by the very behavior it is supposed to explain • This view has several problems: 1. The suggestion that the causes of behavior are inside of us rather than in the environment might influence some to ignore the principles for changing behavior and the enormous amount of data demonstrating that application of those principles can effectively modify behavior 2. Conceptualizing motivation as an internal cause of behavior may influence some to blame the individual for substandard performance by attributing this to a lack of motivation or laziness, rather than trying to help such individuals to improve their performance 3. Conceptualizing motivation as an internal cause of behavior may influence some to blame themselves for failures to emit various behaviors rather then examining potential self-management strategies for improving their performance A BEHAVIORAL VIEW OF MOTIVATION • Motivating operation (MO): is an event or operation that (a) temporarily alters the effectiveness of a reinforcer or punisher (a value-altering effect) and (b) influences behavior that normally leads to that reinforcer or punisher (a behavior- altering effect) • MO involving reinforcers o Example: when we are food deprived, food is a powerful reinforcer. However, after eating a large meal, food looses its effectiveness as a reinforcer and we are less likely to engage in food-seeking behaviors. Thus, deprivation and satiation of food are MOs • MO involving punishers o Example: at the baseball practies, the coach typically requires the player to sit in the dugout alone for 5 minute as a timeout contingent for swearing and misbehaving. However, at todays practice, the coach announces that players can earn points depending on how well they play, and the player with the most points would be awarded tickets to the big game. This immediately made points as reinforcers for the players. Also, it increased the effectiveness of the time out s a punisher because the players could not earn points if they were sitting in the dugout for misbehavior • Motivating establishing operation (MEO): is an event or operation that temporarily increases the effectiveness of a reinforcer or punisher and that increases the likelihood of behaviors that lead to that reinforcer or decreases the likelihood of behaviors that lead to that punisher o Example: food deprivation o Example: points program was an MEO for points because it increased their reinforcing effectiveness, and MEO for timeout because it increased its effectiveness as a punisher • Motivating abolishing operation (MAO): is an event or operation that temporarily decreases the effectiveness of a reinforcer or punisher and that decreases the likelihood of behaviors that lead to that reinforcer or increases the likelihood of behaviors that lead to that punisher o Example: food satiation Unconditioned versus conditioned motivating operations • Unconditioned Motivating Operation (UMO): the value-altering effect is innate but the behavior-altering effect is learned • Unconditioned Motivating Establishing Operation (UMEO): example, deprivation of food because it increases the effectiveness of food as a reinforcer without prior learning o Example: when someone is hungry, the behaviors of looking in the fridge or going to a fast food restaurant are learned behaviors o Example: deprivation of water, sleep, activity, oxygen and sexual stimulation • Unconditioned Motivating Abolishing Operation (UMAO): satiation because it decreases the effectiveness of food as a reinforcer without prior learning o Example: satiation of water, sleep, activity, oxygen and sexual stimulation • Conditioned Motivating Operation (CMO): alter the effectiveness of consequences as reinforcers or punishers because of prior learning • Conditioned Motivating Establishing Operation (CMEO): the coaches announcement of the points program to the basketball players was a CMEO because it establishes points as conditioned reinforcers from prior learning. The announcement wouldn’t have worked as a MO if the players had not previously learned to respond to such announcements D CMEOs and S s • An S is a stimulus that has been correlated with availability of a reinforcer fo
More Less

Related notes for PSYB45H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit