Textbook Notes (368,164)
Canada (161,688)
Psychology (9,695)
PSYC18H3 (275)
G Cupchik (49)
Chapter 9

Chapter 9 - Emotions in Social Relationships.docx

6 Pages
110 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC18H3
Professor
G Cupchik
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 9 ­ Emotions in Social Relationships Summary • Central theme: emotions are social • There are two ways to think about the social nature of emotions o Emotions can structure social relationships o Emotional responses are shaped by the relationships we are in  • In intimate relationships shaped by attachment goals  ▯how desire and love help create intimate bonds • Negative emotional processes and Positive emotional processes that contribute to the quality of marital bonds • Friendships and the broader sense of being socially connected • In hierarchical relationships defined by the goals of power and assertion  ▯emotional displays negotiate rank  • Position of power and social class influences the emotions we feel and our capacity to empathize with others • How emotional processes bind us to groups • How our in­group/out­group dynamics are shaped by emotion  • Moderated by our tendency to forgive • Emotional intelligence, defined by four skills, proves to be a general benefit for many kinds of relationships The Interaction Between Emotions and Social Relationships • Eibl­Eibesfeldt concluded that emotions are the grammar of social relationships • Emotional exchanges are the core elements of the interactions that make up our most meaningful  relationships  • Emotions are profoundly social  ▯we quickly and often unconsciously communicate them to others with  different signal behaviours in the face, in the voice, and in patterns of touch • Emotion­related responses in the ANS enable social behaviours like social connections, as well as fighting or  fleeting  • Emotions are triggered by appraisals that relate to social goals • Emotions guide important social and moral judgments We can approach the social nature of emotions from two directions: (1) Think about how emotions create specific social relationships  a. They are the building blocks of social exchange (ex. emotional experiences help us assume specific  roles within relationships; feelings of romantic passion help us fold into long­term relationships;  feelings of sympathy and filial love help us take on the role of a parent) b. Emotionally expressive behaviours help coordinate social interactions therefore establish specific  relationships  c. Social emotions are scripts of distinctive kinds of relationship (2) Ask how relationship shapes the social dimensions of emotions a. Within different relationships, emotions are likely to shift Emotions within Intimate Relationships  ▯Focus on romantic partnerships  ▯Romantic love is founded on the social motivations of attachment and affiliation: with attachment comes trustfulness  and protection; with affiliation comes the ability for cooperation in joint projects (greatly prevalent in humans  compared to any other animals) Principles of Sexual Love • Healthy relationships are one of the strongest determinants of happiness • Sexual desire and romantic love • Speed Dating (Finkel & Eastwick, 2008) findings: o When one individual feels unique desire and chemistry for another, those feelings are reciprocated  by the person who is the object of attraction o Speed daters who felt sexual attraction for many other people actually generated little desire or  chemistry in those people themselves • Our early feelings of sexual desire are responsive to specific cues: beautiful skin, full lips, and warm eyes;  physical signs of youth, of strength in men and of fecundity in women  • In early sexual passion we can become focused on just one person • Passion is then registered in specific patterns of touch, cuddling, and sexual signalling  • Manifestations of sexual desire are tied to the women’s ovulation and fluctuating estrogen • As romantic partners spend more time with each other, the intense feelings of sexual desire can give way to  experience of romantic love  ▯feelings of deep intimacy • You can’t love someone just by protecting your desire onto them  ▯you can only love by getting to know who  the person is  Emotions in Marriage  • In many societies, feelings of sexual desire, and then of romantic love, lead to long­term commitments within  marriage  • However, the emotional lives of intimate partners will change • Essential to ask about sources of martial distress  • Gottman and Levenson sought to answer the question: what emotional process predicts the demise of  marriage? o Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse:  Toxic emotional behaviours that are most damaging and most likely to predict divorce:  criticism, defensiveness and stonewalling, and contempt (snide remarks, eye­rolling, etc.) • There are several emotional patterns that help romantic partners stay committed and close, one example is: o Capitalizing on the good – share what is good in life with your partner; you are more likely to feel  committed to one another. Instead of stonewalling and criticizing, express appreciation and  encouragement for the good things that happen in your partner’s life • Intimate relations also fare well when partners cultivate humour, amusement, and play: o The middle phase of marriage involves a great deal of drudgery (i.e. dealing with babies and  children) and intimate relationships are least satisfied at this stage  o Romantic partners also face their own problems (i.e. difficulties at work, financial/health problems,  etc.) o Amusement, mirth, and play are emotional antidotes  o Humour and laughter can deescalate conflicts  o Stay playful • Cultivate compassionate love: a positive regard for the partner and appreciation of the partner’s foibles and  weaknesses  • Forgiveness is also important  ▯it involves a shift in feeling toward someone who has done you harm, away  from ideas about revenge and avoidance toward a more positive understanding of the humanity of that person   ▯Recognizing that err is human  o Three dimensions related to forgiveness:  The urge for revenge  The desire to avoid the partner  A more compassionate view of the partners’ mistake o Forgiveness promotes relationship satisfaction  Emotions in Friendships  ▯Friendships are central social life; based on the distinctively human social goal of affiliation, which affords friendly  cooperation in accomplishing things together that we couldn’t do alone   ▯Friendship requires cooperation with non­kin, and from an evolutionary POV it seems problematic for individuals to  devote resources to others whose success brings no benefits to the benefactor’s genes  ▯Trivers proposed: cooperative alliances like friendships have emerged in human evolution, and are successful in our  more immediate lives, to the extent that there is reciprocal giving and affection Gratitude  • Adam Smith argued that gratitude and sentiment hold people together, in spirit of common cause • Gratitude is the glue of cooperative social living among non­kin = moral emotion: o Gratitude helps us keep track of which friends are generous and which are not (similar to grooming  among nonhuman primates) o Gratitude motivates altruistic and affectionate behaviour • Gratitude is a powerful determinant of prosocial behaviour • Expression of gratitude (verbally or otherwise) acts as a reward; reinforces affectionate, cooperative  behaviour  • Expression of gratitude predict increased closeness among group members over time  Mimicry • Humans are imitative species  • We like to imitate the emotions of others  • Emotional mimicry is the central ingredient of friendships • We feel closer to other people who share our attitudes, preferences and beliefs • Smoski & Bachorowski  ▯friends quickly imitate one another’s signs of amusement and thereby enjoy the  pleasure and perspective of humour and play • Physical mimicry is the basis of increased closeness among potential friends • Emotional mimicry helps build friendships and predicts increased closeness in friendship  Social Support • Sense of social support = strong feelings of being surrounded by good friends during times of need • Strong social support exercises powerful influences upon people’s emotional lives  • Social support reduces feelings of stress, anxiety, and uncertainty during difficult and challenging times • Having friends present in stressful contexts reduces stress­related physiology  Emotions in Hierarchical Relationships  ▯Russell (1938) argued that all social relationships (i.e. children on playgro
More Less

Related notes for PSYC18H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit