Textbook Notes (368,013)
Canada (161,562)
Psychology (9,695)
PSYC18H3 (275)
Chapter 3

Chapter 3 – Cultural Understandings of Emotions.docx

4 Pages
112 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC18H3
Professor
Gerald Cupchik
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 3 – Cultural Understandings of Emotions The Construction of Emotions in the West Culture: it’s a system of ideas & practices that are held in common in a particular society, or set of societies Society: group of people who live in a particular place at a particular time • Plato thought emotions arise from the lower part of the mind & pervert reason • Darwin implied that in human adults, expressions of emotions are obsolete (old fashioned), vestiges (leftover) of our evolution from our  hominid predecessors & of our development from infancy  • Appreciation of emotions became marked in Europe and American during the historical era of Romanticism • In Romantic era emotions came to be valued in personal life, politics, literature, & philosophy  st • Jean­Jacques Rousseau  ▯1  articulations of the Romantic spirit o Published the idea that religious sensibility is based on how you feel rather than on authority, or on Scripture, or on arguments for  the existence of God o Proposed that education should be natural, people’s natural emotions indicate what is right  o “Man is born free, and is everywhere in chains”, his phrase became the rallying call in the French Revolution • Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, one of the world’s 1  science fiction stories o Frankenstein is about the emotional themes of Romanticism, about the artificial creature’s initial natural emotions of kindness  Theme of Romanticism: settings amid wild scenery, the emphasis on the natural, distrust of the artificial, apprehension  of humans arrogantly overstepping their boundaries A Cultural Approach to Emotion • In the West, emotions are both irrational & authentic aspect of the true self, are products of the culture of Europe & North America • A cultural approach involves the assumption that emotions are constructed primarily by the processes of cultures o How emotions are valued to how they are elicited are shaped by culture­specific beliefs & practices, which have been affected by  historical & economic forces • Emotions can be thought of as roles that people fulfill to play out culture­specific identities & relationships o Ex: falling in love, acts as a temporary social role  It provides an outline script for the role of “lover”   The emotion “falling in love” accomplishes a transition from one structure of social relationships to another • Batja Mesquita contends that cultural approaches focus on the “practice” of emotion, in contrast to the “potential” for emotion • Potential means asking whether people of different cultures, if put in an appropriate experimental situations, would be capable of showing  certain universal emotional responses in terms of experience, expression, physiology o The answer is YES • Practice refers to what actually happens in people’s emotional lives o The day to day emotional experiences of people from different cultures do differ Self­Construal: Independent & Interdependent Selves • 2 types of self­construal that affect emotions 1. Independent self­construal also referred to as individualism • To assert one’s distinctiveness 7 independence, and to define oneself according to unique traits & preferences, with a focus on internal  causes, such as one’s own disposition or preferences, which are thought of as stable across time & social context 2. Interdependent, collectivist, self construal • The self is fundamentally connected to other people • The imperative is to find one’s status, identity, roles within the community, families, organizations • The emphasis is on the social context & the situational influences on behaviour • One thinks of oneself as embedded within social relationships, roles, duties, with a self that is ever­changing & shifting, shaped by different  contexts, relationships, roles Independent Self Interdependent Self I am autonomous, separate I am connected to others I have unique traits & preferences I fulfill roles & duties My behaviour is caused by internal causes My behaviour is the result of the social context Who I am is stable across contexts Who I am varies across contexts • The interdependent Japanese students reported more intense experiences of positive, socially engaging emotions (respect, sympathy) and  negative socially engaging emotions (shame, guilt) • The independent American students reported more intense experiences of (+), socially disengaging emotions (pride, high self­esteem) and  (­) socially disengaging emotions (anger, frustration) • Self construal perspectives reveal how culture influences the kinds of emotions we experience, & which emotions we privilege & value,  they also reveal culture specific ways in which emotions evoke responses in others o Ex: Japanese babies took longer to respond to mother’s angry voice because such highly negative events were rare Values Value: principles that govern our social behaviour • To be sincere in America is to act in accord with one’s innermost emotions • In Japan, the concept translated as sincerity, means doing a social duty, not according to inner feelings, but doing it without inner conflict • Members of cultures that differ in the importance of specific values should experience different elicitors of emotions • Elicitors of jealousy that seem obvious in 1 culture do not seem to evoke jealousy in another o Ex: In the West, jealousy tends to be felt when the sexual attention of a primary partner turns toward someone else  This is because the West have a monogamy relationship o Societies with non­monogamous relationships do get jealous if marriage partners had lovers • Cultural psychologists made the argument that cultures vary as to which emotions are focal, or prominent in daily life, according to cultural  differences in values o In some cultures the value of honor is focal: it involves paying respect to others in acts of politeness & deference o Individuals from high­honor cultures responded with greater shame & anger when insulted, because these emotions protect honor  and “face”  Not showing anger would mean that one is weak o In US, the South showed more anger in their facial expression than the North  They also showed higher levels of testosterone & cortisol o Suicide is more frequent in high honor American states • Cultural differences in specific values have been found to influence spontaneous emotional responses o Ex: emotional control is highly valued in East Asian cultures  Spontaneous expression of emotion is thought to risk disrupting social harmony, is discouraged o More spontaneous emotional expression is more highly valued in Western European cultures • The extent that emotions reinforce particular values of importance to culture, those emotions should be highly valued • Jeanne Tsai’s affect evaluation theory  o Emotions that promote specific cultural values & ideals are valued more & as a result should play a more prominent role in the  social lives of individuals  Ex: in the US, excitement is greatly valued, it enables people to purpose a cultural ideal of self­expression & 
More Less

Related notes for PSYC18H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit