Textbook Notes (368,566)
Canada (161,966)
Psychology (9,696)
PSYC31H3 (106)
Chapter 1

Clinical Neuropsychology Chapter 1 Notes

7 Pages
124 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC31H3
Professor
Zachariah Campbell
Semester
Winter

Description
Clinical Neuropsychology: CHAPTER ONE Clinical neuropsychology is a specialty area in the field of psychology that focuses on  how the brain functions within the normal individual and what happens to an individual  with brain illness or brain injury.  Questions a clinical neuropsychologist would ask themselves: Why does he behave and  think as he does? ­ called applied because it deals with the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of the  individuals with brain injuries or illnesses. ­ Experimental neuropsychology: focuses on brain­behaviour relationships within  humans and other animals. They do this by describing structures and functions, as  opposed to focusing on assessment process and the development of a treatment plan.  Historical Background: th ­ the term neuropsychology was first used by Sir William Osler on April 16  1913. ­ During that time of period, neuropsychology represented the combined interests  of many disciplines including psychologists, neurologists, psychiatrists, speech  pathologists and others interested in the relationship between the brain and  behavior. ­ Neuropsych was ultimately related to the study of the relationship between the  brain and behavior.  ­ Most of the subjects for the early studies were animals. ­ Trephination is the oldest known surgical technique in which a small piece of  bone is removed from the skull leaving a hole in the skull. The procedure has  been done for medical and religious reasons. (Neolithic period/stone age). ­ Verona systematically studied trephined skulls to see if there was a pattern to the  use of trephining. He looked at 750 Skulls collected from Peru and concluded that  the ancient Peruvians did trephine some children and adult women but focused  mainly on adult men. Most Trephining occurred in areas we now know as the  frontal and upper parietal regions. ­ Some individuals who experienced the trephining procedure and survived  probably had residual damage caused by the lack of precision in the procedure,  which may have affected multiple areas of the brain. ­ However, there are individuals who have undergone the procedure and was able  to function normally after. The Egyptians: ­ They were thought to have been advanced in many and diverse areas but,  surprisingly, were not as advanced in their understanding of the brain. ­  The process of mummification could take as long as 70 days to complete. ­ Organs are removed from the body but not  the heart. ­ Because, the heart is the seat of the mind and soul and the person will need it for  afterlife. ­ Edwin Smith Surgical Papyrus: early Egyptian manuscript which described the  techniques used to treat various forms of difficulties including brain trauma. ­ It is one of the first accounts of brain­behaviour relationships. ­ A brain­behaviour relationship exists when a function of the brain is thought to  cause or influence a particular behavior. ­ Although the document is called Surgical papyrus, there were no indications that  actual surgery was performed. ­ The document gave reference to what are currently the meninges and the  cerebrospinal fluid.  ­ The papyrus also discussed early ways to determine which patients could be  successfully treated, which patients’ status was questionable, and which patients  were too severely impaired for treatment.  ­ Within the Edwin Smith Surgical Papyrus are accounts of 48 individuals with  physical injuries and 27 with trauma to the head. ­ Included, were ways to reduce intracranial hemorrhaging and the removal of  fragments of bone from the ear canal and blood clots from the sinuses. ­ As we recall the Egyptians still believed that illness and other maladies were  caused by various deities. ­ The Ebers Papyrus is often thought to contain more magical or superstitious forms  of healing than the Edwin Smith Surgical Papyrus. ­ The Herophilus and Erasistratus From the city of Alexandria were the first to  propose the brain as the center of reason. They provided the first accurate and  detailed description of the human brain including the ventricles. ­ These people completed most of their work on cadavers and also used condemned  criminals for vivisection. ­ Vivisection: the dissection of the body, animal or human while it is still living. ­ They do this with the intention that physicians could learn new facts about the  human body. ­ Ventricular localization hypothesis: The hypothesis that mental and spiritual  processes reside within the ventricular canals. ­ Cell doctrine: a term synonymous with the ventricular localization hypothesis i.e.  that the ventricles were the location of higher order mental and spatial processes. ­ Cerebrospinal fluid: cushions the brain within the skull, is made in the choroid  plexuses and flows through the ventricles and the subarachnoid space, the space  between the layers of the brain. Ancient Greeks: ­ Were interested in accounts of brain­behaviour relationships. ­ Heraclitus along with Parmenides, were considered the most significant  philosopher of ancient Greece until Socrates and Plato. ­ Pythagoras, a mathematician was the first to suggest that the brain was the organ  responsible for human thought.  ­ Brain hypothesis: the hypothesis that the brain is the source of human thought and  behavior. ­ Follower of Pythagoras believed in natural science and Philosophy. ­ They lived together in a communal group and followed a strict ethical code of  conduct.  ­ Hippocrates considered being the founder of modern medicine, further expanded  the understanding of the brain. ­ Hippocratic Oath: an agreement that Hippocrates demanded of physicians  ensuring that they would do no harm in their quest to appropriately treat their  patients. ­ They were the first to indicate that damage to one side of the brain affect the other  side of the brain: Contralateral control. ­  Hippocrates was a physician who practice holistic medicine,  a belief that the  body, mind and soul must be addressed for successful treatment of the patient.  ­ Plato, a student of Socrates and philosopher of human behavior, thought that the  soul was divided into three functions: appetite, reason, and temper, which reside  within the brain.  ­ Plato also discussed the mind­body question. ­ Discussed to further explain the harmony between the mind and the body, health  wise. ­ However, Aristotle, a student of Plato, disagreed with him, instead believes that  the heart is the main organ of rational thought.  ­ Cardiac Hypothesis: the heart was the originator of numerous emotions. The Romans: ­ Galen: is considered the first experimental physiologist and physician. ­ Galen was a believer, similar to Aristotle, that the only valid sources of data were  direct observations. ­ He completed dissections and vivisections on animals closely resembling humans. ­ Humors: the belief that a balance of bodily fluids including blood, mucus, and  yellow and black bile were responsible for the functioning of the body and the  brain. ­ Galen believed that stroke resulted either from an accumulation of a thick cold  humor (such as phlegm or black bile) in the ventricles or from obstructions of the  flow of animal spirits. The Middle Ages: ­ During the Middle Ages, there was a return to superstitious beliefs regarding the  causes of many of the difficulties people exhibited.  ­ Aristotle’s work were rediscovered and translated and made available to an  expanded audience. ­ His view were accepted as sacred and any questioning was unacceptable.  ­ During this period of time, the church was considered the ultimate authority on all  matters. ­ Albertus Magnus theorized that behavior resulted from a combination of brain  structures including the cortex, the midbrain, and the cerebellum. ­ The works of Middle Eastern scientists and healers only became familiar to  Europeans at the end of the Middle Ages.  Renaissance Europe: ­ begun in Italy in the mid­14  century and ended during the 16  century. h ­ The renaissance marked the end of medieval Europe and allowed intellectual  freedom to flourish.  ­ Surprisingly, one of the major factors in the start of the Renaissance was the  plague of the 1300s, the Black Death. ­ Leonardo Da Vinci conducte
More Less

Related notes for PSYC31H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit