Textbook Notes (367,824)
Canada (161,435)
Psychology (9,688)
PSYC33H3 (39)
Chapter

Memory rehabilitation_Glisky.docx

5 Pages
92 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC33H3
Professor
Kris Romero
Semester
Spring

Description
Memory rehabilitation in older adults ­ Glisky ­ Adult brain is plastic and learning continues into oldest ages and there is potential to modify the downward  trajectories in memory function that have been associated w/ normal aging ­ Providing set of principles to base memory interventions for older adults is difficult b/c aging population is  heterogeneous Memory changes in aging Normal aging – declines in episodic, source, working, and prospective memory. Intact semantic, implicit, and procedural  memory AD – severe deficits in episodic memory in early stages and decline in semantic memory Normal aging ­ Most difficulties in aging adults – episodic memory for recent personally experienced events/ episodes o Slow decline in late 40s and 50s, quick decline after early to mid 70s ­ Even within episodic memory, not all aspects are equally affected o Most decline in tasks that require free recall of unrelated words or memory for novel info o Least decline in tasks that require recognition or retrieval of familiar events ­ Also, old adults have difficulty than young in remembering contextual details or source info, while they retain  focal or gist info ­ Older ppl are impaired on memory tasks that require self initiation of encoding or retrieval processes o They fail to initiate elaborate semantic encoding processes, thus create memory traces that are  impoverished, thus difficult to retrieve o Also fail to integrate contextual aspects of event during encoding o Fail to initiate strategic search or monitoring processes at retrieval ­ Initiating effortful encoding/retrieval strategies requires mental energy, which declines w/ age or is allocated less  efficiently ­ Older adults have intact STM (passively maintaining info like in digit span forwards) but impaired working  memory (manipulation like in digits backwards) ­ Older adults dont have problems with real­world prospective memory b/c they use external aids (calendars,  notebooks) ­ But impaired in prospective memory in the laboratory b/c no aids and cues aren’t made salient – here, they show  expected decline in prospective memory ­ In contrast, semantic memory is intact in old age (info that has accumulated over the ears, vocabulary, general  world knowledge) ­ Exception – retrieval of familiar names (b/c they have difficulty w/ specific details) ­ Procedural memory, priming, implicit memory holds up well ­ Summary – tasks that are resource­demanding, require self­initiation of encoding/retrieval strategies, retrieval of  specific details declines. Well­learned general knowledge and skills is preserved Alzheimer's Disease ­ Episodic memory is first to decline. Degree of decline is much greater than normal aging (more than 2SD below  avg) ­ They have increasing difficulty producing words to conceptual cues and understanding meaning of words  (semantic issues) as disease progresses ­ Also impaired in conceptual and semantic priming (automatic responses to meaning­based cues) but have intact  perceptual priming semantic priming ­ Summary – severe and global episodic memory impairment, gradually increasing decline in semantic memory Neural correlates of memory and aging Normal aging – memory decline due to changes in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus ­ Memory issues are likely due to atrophy or shrinkage in medial temporal and/or prefrontal regions, and in white  matter ­ Most marked changes ­ prefrontal AD – episodic memory decline due to loss of entorhinal cortex and hippocampus (early stages), which spreads to  neocortical regions to disrupt semantic memory ­ Earliest changes are in medial temporal lobe (entorhinal), then parietal, lateral temporal, and prefrontal cortex ­ White matter declines in both Patterns of mapping memory functions in neuroanatomy ­ Left prefrontal cortex –encoding into episodic memory and retrieval from semantic memory. Involved in  meaningful and elaborate processing during encoding of episodic memories ­ Right prefrontal cortex – episodic retrieval processes (retrieval mode, effort, monitoring) ­ Medial temporal brain regions (including hippocampus) – both encoding and retrieval o Hippocampus – consolidation (by binding various elements of an experience together and to its  spatiotemporal context), maintaining an index to see these various components for retrieval ­ Lateral temporal cortex – semantic memory ­ Basal ganglia & cerebellum – procedural memory ­ Studies found reduced activity in medial temporal lobe during episodic encoding in older ­ adults than young ­ Other studies found increased activity in prefrontal cortex during retrieval in older than young adults o Increases are usu. bilateral in older adults and unilateral in younger. Increases are usu. only found in high­ performing older adults  ­ Explanations of these opposite findings – increased activity represents compensation that may indicate the  recruitment of complementary processes from other hemisphere or functional reorganization of brain in those who  age most successfully Goals and methods of rehabilitation ­ Methods are organized into 3 broad goals which are differentially attainable depending on severity of memory  problem: 1) Optimization of existing or residual memory function 2) Substitution of intact function for declining or lost function 3) External compensation for lost or reduced function 1) Optimization of existing or residual function ­ These methods appropriate fro those w/ considerable residual memory function, but not for those w/ severe impairment ­ Many older adults do not spontaneously engage effective encoding or retrieval processes, but can be trained to use  residual mnemonic processes ­ Training can focus on encoding strategies (visual imagery, semantic elaboration, generation, self­referential processing,  encoding) or on retrieval processes (recollection ­ General non­mnemonic methods such as practice, aerobic exercise, stimulating lifestyles and nonprescription drugs  (glucose) ­ Older adults do not use proper mnemonic activities when confronted w/ memory tasks, but are capable of learning  – called production deficit. They find the strategies resource­demanding ­ Young adults do use some encoding/retrieval strategies spontaneously ­ This age difference is due to reduced processing resources in older ppl, and greater amount of experience or  practice that young ppl with memorization tasks ­ These methods assume that older ppl have processing capabilities to carry out the mnemonic activities and that  retraining and practice will revive the lost processes ­ Thus, these methods rely on preexisting/ residual memory and brain function ­ Most effective for high­functioning older adults Training encoding strategies ­ Focus on creating encodings that are meaningful and elaborate, and on establishing cues that are readily available  at time of retrieval ­ Most often method – visual imagery Visual imagery ­ Requires formation of distinctive visual images or material­to­be­remembered, which are then linked to some  easily retrievable cues such as well­learned locations in method of loci, set of keywords in the peg­word method,  or features of a face for learning name/face associations ­ Found to be effective for remembering names, lists and locations but they are not maintained or generalized ­ One study found that learning how to encode, using visual imagery and the method of loci was the critical  component in the success of training, not the fact that it is multifactorial ­ Whether ppl use mnemonic strategies spontaneously may depend on the amount of practice they have using them o Emphasis on importance of practice o Time and energy investment is needed to make these strategies less resource­demanding and more likely  to be used o Since this training is time­consuming, its not accepted by older ppl (drop out rates are 40%) ­ Summary – although older ppl can benefit from training in visual imagery mnemonics after extensive practice,  benefits are usu. task specific and don’t generalize to untrained/ real world tasks. Also, although some older adults  benefit from imagery training, young ppl have greater benefits b/c some older ppl may have processing deficit in  addition to their production deficit Semantic elaboration ­ Uses intact verbal skills ­ These strategies are not spontaneously engaged by older people ­ Early studies show that older adults improved their recognition memory when given deep processing instructions  relative to intentional learning instructions, whereas young ppl performed as well or better in the intentional  learning condition ­ Recognition of names was impaired in older adults in the learning condi
More Less

Related notes for PSYC33H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit