Byrm 2nd Edition notes to the Social Interaction Chapter. Insanely helpful for studying.

511 views12 pages
26 Nov 2010
School
Department
Course
Professor
Social Interaction t Brym Chapter 5 p. 135-155
What is Social Interaction?
 Social Interaction: the creation of a novel (new) way for people to communicate
face to face, acting and reacting in relation to each other.
Overview of example used in this section:
o Airlines first opened during early 20s, hired cabin boys and stewards.
o dZv]vZïìvñìZP}À[PµoZ]vµÇUul]vPoo
airlines identical.
o Shortly after, they hired large numbers of women (stewardesses) as
glamorous sex objects to lure more clientele and differentiate each other
from their competition.
The Structure of Social Interaction
 Status: recognized positions occupied by interacting people
- Each person occupies many statuses:
Status Set: the entire collection of statuses occupied by an individual
Ascribed Status: involuntary status t status that one is born into
Eg. Daughter
Achieved Status: voluntary status t acquired on the basis of merit
Eg. Flight Attendant
Master Status: status that is most influential in Z]vP}v[o]( at
a given time
 Roles: Sets of expected behaviours (functions to perform)
- While people occupy statuses, they perform roles
Role Set: a cluster of roles attached to a single status
Eg. Someone occupying a flight attendant status may play the roles of in-
flight safety expert and server
 Norms: Generally accepted ways of doing things. Norms often change over time
(How you go about carrying out these roles?)
Prescriptive Norms: what a person is expected to do while performing a
specific role
Proscriptive Norms: what a person is expected not to do while
performing a particular role
www.notesolution.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 12 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
Example the book goes in depth with, may or may not be exam material
(skip if you want)
Case Study: Stewardesses and Their Clientele
 Ellen Church t Á}o[(]Á
 Main role to reassure apprehensive flyers they were in safe hands in the event of
an emergency (flying much more dangerous back then)
 ^Á[µv](}uÁ]PvUZ}vZuo]v}Àlvv
everyone wanted to fly with Braniff (airline company who introduced the idea)
 À]]vP(ovÁÆ]}vµ}µv]vPZÁ[role as
sex objects
The Enforcement of Norms
 ]o]v](]vv(}uvÇv}u]v]vP}ZÁ[role
o The expectations of passengers helped reinforce those norms
 Until early 70s, could not be single or pregnant t had to be attractive, slim, good
smile and achieve certain IQ
 Appear charming and solicitous (caring) - ,}ZÀ]oo[}Z
clientele
Role Conflict and Role Strain
 Role Conflict: occurs when 2 or more statuses held at the same time place
contradictory role demands on a person
o d}Ç[(uo(o]PZvvuÇZÀ(µvv(}uZ}u
and be mothers/wives which require considerable time at home
Mom Flight Attendant
Wife
 Demands and expectations placed on stewardesses in 60s maximized role strain
 Role Strain: occurs when incompatible role demands are placed on a person in a
single status
o Constantly having to be suggestive while also politely warding off
unwanted/crude advances made the stewardess role very stressful
Be suggestive < Stewardess > Be polite
Change in Status
 From 50s to early 80s, stewardesses much like celebrities - glamorous
 ButY the pay and housing conditions they got were poor
 Since that era, the status of stewardesses have changed into flight attendants
 In 60s and 70s, they won changes in rules regarding marriage, pregnancy,
retirement and hiring of men
www.notesolution.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 12 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
What Shapes Social Interaction?
 Norms, roles and statuses* are the building bocks that structure our interaction
 We typically think our interactions = outcomes of our emotional states
o Eg. We interact differently with people depending on if they make us
mad or make us laugh
 We assume emotions are deeply personal states of mind evoked involuntarily as
a result of uncontrollable action t but our emotions are not as unique,
involuntary and uncontrollable as we are often lead to believe
 These building blocks* µ]Z}]ouv[}ÀvZu(}u(oo]vP
apart and turning them into durable social structure - How is social structure
maintained?
 There are three main ways of maintaining social interaction thereby cementing
social structures and society as a whole (Modes of Interaction):
y by means of domination
y competition
y cooperation
 First however, turn to problems of emotions beginning with laughter and
humour
The Sociology of Emotions
Laughter and Humour
 Robert Provine: did a research on laughing and genders
o Eavesdropped on 2-person groups (dyads)
o Wrote down who laughed and gender of speaker + listener
 Speakers laugh more often than listeners do
 Women laugh twice as often as men, even when they listen
 But men get more laughs than women
 Sociological Interpretation: laughter is unevenly distributed across the status
hierarchy
o High status t get more laughs
o Low status t laugh more
 Eg. Downward Humour: in a psychiatric hospital, psychiatrists made residents
the target of their humour whereas the residents & paramedics targeted the
patients or themselves
 Laughter is not as spontaneous as we think t signal of dominance or
subservience (compliant to authority)
www.notesolution.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 12 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in

Document Summary

Social interaction j brym chapter 5 p. 135-155. S social interaction: the creation of a novel (new) way for people to communicate face to face, acting and reacting in relation to each other. S status: recognized positions occupied by interacting people. Status set: the entire collection of statuses occupied by an individual. Ascribed status: involuntary status j status that one is born into. Achieved status: voluntary status j acquired on the basis of merit. Master status: status that is most influential in zyl2yzlz at a given time. S roles: sets of expected behaviours (functions to perform) While people occupy statuses, they perform roles. Role set: a cluster of roles attached to a single status. Someone occupying a flight attendant status may play the roles of in- flight safety expert and server. S norms: generally accepted ways of doing things. Norms often change over time (how you go about carrying out these roles?)

Get access

Grade+20% OFF
$8 USD/m$10 USD/m
Billed $96 USD annually
Grade+
Homework Help
Study Guides
Textbook Solutions
Class Notes
Textbook Notes
Booster Class
40 Verified Answers
Class+
$8 USD/m
Billed $96 USD annually
Class+
Homework Help
Study Guides
Textbook Solutions
Class Notes
Textbook Notes
Booster Class
30 Verified Answers