Textbook Notes (368,329)
Canada (161,802)
Sociology (12)
SOCA02H3 (12)
Chapter 11

SOCA02H3 CHAPTER 11 LECTURE 2.docx

10 Pages
86 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOCA02H3
Professor
Sheldon Ungar
Semester
Winter

Description
SOCA02H3  WEEK 2: 01.16.2014 CHAPTER 11: SEXUALITIES AND GENDER STRATIFICATION SEX VERSUS GENDER Is It a Boy or a Girl? ­ April 27, 1966, eight­month­old identical twin boys were brought to a hospital to  be circumcised, unfortunately the needle entirely burned off one baby’s penis ­ More than half a year later, the parents heard Dr. John Money say that he could  assign babies a male or female identity o Money had been the driving force behind the creation of the world’s first  few sex change clinics at Johns Hopkins o Known for his research on intersexed infants Intersexed infants are babies born with ambiguous genitals because of a hormone  imbalance in the womb or some other cause.  ­ The boy, named Bruce, was reassigned as a girl and named Brenda but had  struggled against his/her imposed girlhood from the start  ­ At the age of 16, she decided to have her sex reassigned once more and had done  so successfully, adopting the new name David ­ Unfortunately David committed suicide at the age of 38 Gender Identity and Gender Role ­ What makes us male or female?  ­ Part of the answer is biological Your sex depends on whether you were born with distinct male or female genitals and a  genetic program the released either male or female hormones to stimulate the  development of your reproductive system.  Gender refers to the feelings, attitudes, desires, and behaviours that are associated with a  particular sexual category.  o Gender has three components:  1. Sexuality refers to a person’s capacity for erotic experiences and expressions. 2. Gender identity refers to a person’s sense of belonging to a particular sexual  category (“male,” “female,” “homosexual,” “lesbian,” “bisexual,” and so on). 3. Gender role refers to behavior that conforms to widely shared expectations about  how members of a particular sexual category are supposed to act.  ­ Research shows that babies first develop a vague sense of being a boy or girl at  the age of one; full­blown identification occurs between the ages of two and three ­ People learn conventional gender roles in the course of everyday interaction,  during socialization in the family and at school, and through advertising Heteronormativity is the belief that sex is binary (one must be either male or female as  conventionally understood) and that sex ought to be perfectly aligned with gender (one’s  1 sexuality, gender identity, and gender role ought to be either male or female as  conventionally understood).  ­ Thus people regard heterosexuality as normal and reinforce it ­ For reasons that are still not understood, some people resist and even reject the  gender they’re assigned to based on biological sex Summing Up • One’s sex depends on whether one is born with distinct male or female genitals  and a genetic program that releases either male or female hormones to stimulate  the development of the reproductive system • Gender refers to the feelings, attitudes, desires, and behaviors that are associated  with a particular sexual category – specifically, the capacity for erotic experiences  and expressions (sexuality); self­identification as male, female, homosexual,  lesbian, bisexual, and so on (gender identity); and behavior that conforms to  widely shared expectations about how members of a particular sexual category  are supposed to act (gender role)  THEORIES OF GENDER ­ Most arguments about the origins of gender differences in human behavior adopt  one of two perspectives 1. Essentialism  ▯a school of thought that views gender differences as a  reflection of biological differences between women and men  Gender differences are a reflection of naturally evolved  dispositions 2. Social constructionism  ▯gender as constructed by people living in  historically specific social structures and cultures  Gender differences a reflection of the different social positions  occupied by women and men Modern Essentialism: Sociobiology and Evolutionary Psychology ­ Sigmund Freud (1977) offered early essentialist explanation of male­female  differences  ­ In recent decades, sociobiologist and evolutionary psychologists offered the most  influential variant of the theory o All humans instinctively try to ensure that their genes are passed on to  future generations o A woman has a bigger investment than a man does in ensuring the survival  of any offspring because she produces only a small number of eggs during  reproductive life o Most women can only give birth to about 20 children o Thus in women’s best interest to maintain primary responsibility for  genetic children by finding best mate to fertilize her eggs and help support  children after birth 2 o Men can produce hundreds of millions of sperm in single ejaculation; men  also compete with each other for sexual access to women, men evolve  competitive and aggressive dispositions o Women, according to one evolutionary psychologist, are greedy for  money, while men want casual sex with women, treat women’s bodies as  their property, and react violently to women who incite male sexual  jealousy o These are “universal features of our evolved selves”, contributing to the  survival of human species ­ Gender differences in behavior are thus based in biological differences between  women and men Functionalism and Essentialism  ­ Functionalists reinforce the essentialist viewpoint, claiming that traditional gender  roles help to integrate society ­ In the family women traditionally specialize in raising children and managing the  household  ­ Men traditionally work in the paid labour force; each generation learns to perform  complementary roles by means of gender role socialization  ­ For boys the essence of masculinity is a series of “instrumental” traits, i.e.  rationality, self­assuredness, and competitiveness  ­ For girls the essence of femininity is a series of “expressive” traits, i.e. nurturance  and sensitivity to others ­ In the family, boys and girls learn their respective roles through seeing their  parents daily routines ­ In the larger society, gender roles are promoted for conformity; it instills that men  won’t be seen as attractive to girls if they’re too feminine and vice versa  ­ In the functionalist view, learning essential features of femininity and masculinity  integrates society and allows it to function properly A Critique of Essentialism from the Conflict and Feminist Perspectives  ­ Conflict and feminist theorists disagree with the essentialist account using four  main critcisms 1. Essentialists ignore the historical and cultural variability of gender and  sexuality   Wide variations of what constitutes masculinity and femininity  exists  Level of gender inequality, rate of male violence against women,  criteria used more mate selection, and other gender differences that  appear universal vary widely  Variation thus deflates idea of how essential and universal  behavioral differences are  a. Societies with low levels of gender inequality, tendency  decreases for women to stress the good provider role in  3 selecting male partners along with tendency for men to  stress women’s domestic skills b. When women become corporate lawyers, police officers, or  other jobs involving threat, their production of hormone  testosterone is stimulated, causing them to act more  aggressively c. Women are developing traits that were traditionally  masculine; women have become more assertive,  competitive, independent, and analytical in the past few  decades 2. Essentialists tend to generalize from the average, ignoring variations  within gender groups   On average, women and men differ in some respects i.e. men are  more verbally and physically aggressive than women are  Though there is considerable overlap in aggressiveness between  women and men 3. Little or no evidence directly supports the essentialists’ major claims   Sociobiologists and evolutionary psychologists haven’t identified  any genes that cause male jealousy, female nurturance, the unequal  division of labor between men and women, and etc.  4. Essentialists’ explanation for gender differences ignore the role of power   Assume existing behavior patterns help ensure survival of the  species and smooth functioning of society  Essentialists generally ignore fact that men are usually in a position  of greater power and authority than women are ­  Conflict theoris  state that men gained substantial power over women when  preliterate societies were able to produce more than amount needed for  subsistence ­ Some men gained control over economic surplus, devising two means of ensuring  offspring would inherit surplus a) Imposed the rule that only men could own property b) By means of socialization and force, ensured that women remained  sexually faithful to their husbands ­ Male domination increased as industrial capitalism made men wealthier and  powerful while relegating women to subordinate, domestic roles ­  Feminist theorist  doubt that male domination isn’t so closely linked to  development of industrial capitalism  a) Gender inequality is greater than capitalist, agrarian societies than in  industrial capitalist societies b) Male domination is evident in societies that are socialist or communist ­ Male domination is rooted less in industrial capitalism than in patriarchal  authority relations, family structures, and patterns of socialization and culture  ­ Both conflict and feminist theorists agree that behavioral differences result less  from any essential differences than from men being in a position to impose their  interests on women 4 Social Constructionism and Symbolic Interactionism ­ Essentialism is the view that masculinity and femininity is something inherent and  universal through biological or social necessity ­ Social constructionism is the view that apparent natural or innate features of life  i.e. gender are sustained by social processes that vary historically and culturally ­ Conflict and feminist theorists may be seen as types of social constructionism as  well as symbolic interactionism  Gender Segregation and Interaction   ­ Adolescents usually start choosing courses in school by the age of 14 or 15 and by  then they’ve formed gender ideologies Gender ideologies are sets of interrelated ideas about what constitutes appropriate  masculine and feminine roles and behavior.  Summing Up • By holding that traditional gender roles help to integrate society, functionalists  support th
More Less

Related notes for SOCA02H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit