Textbook Notes (368,448)
Canada (161,886)
Sociology (12)
SOCA02H3 (12)
Chapter 15

SOCA02H3 CHAPTER 15 LECTURE 3.docx

8 Pages
124 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOCA02H3
Professor
Sheldon Ungar
Semester
Winter

Description
SOCA02H3  WEEK 3: 01.23.2014 CHAPTER 15: FAMILIES IS “THE FAMILY” IN DECLINE? ­ For better or for worse, our most intense emotional experiences are bound up with  our families; we express different emotions to nobody as much as our parents,  siblings, children, and mates ­ Given the intensity of emotional involvement with families, it’s no surprise that  family issues lie close to the centre of political debate Is the family in decline and, if so, what should be done about it? ­ This question has been asked since the mid­nineteenth century ­ When people speak about “the decline of the family,” they’re referring to the  nuclear family A nuclear family consists of a cohabiting man and woman who maintain a socially  approved sexual relationship and have at least one child.  The traditional nuclear family is when the wife works in the home without pay while  the husband works outside the home for money. ­ 1901, 69% of Canadian families were nuclear but by 2006, fewer than 39% of  Canadian families were nuclear Summing Up • The nuclear family used to be the most prevalent family form, but many new  family forms now exist. • Controversy exists over whether the decline of the nuclear family causes a wide  range of social ills or is a useful adaptation to new social pressures. FUNCTIONALISM AND THE NUCLEAR IDEAL Functional Theory  ­ For any society to survive, its members need to cooperate economically ­ The must have and raise babies in an emotionally supportive environment so  babies can learn the norms and operate as productive adults ­ Since 1940s, functionalists argued that the nuclear family is ideally suited to meet  these needs; it performs five main functions: provides basis for regulated sexual  activity, economic cooperation, reproduction, socialization, and emotional support ­ Functionalists are aware that other family forms exists o Polygamy expands the nuclear family “horizontally” by adding one or  more spouses (usually women) to the household.  o Polygamy still legally permitted in less industrialized countries in Africa  and Asia but monogamy is more prevalent because families cannot support  more wives and children 1  The extended family expands the nuclear family “vertically” by adding  another generation – one or more of the spouses’ parents – to the  household  Extended family used to be common but, according to functionalists, the  basic building blocks of the extended family (and polygamous) is the  nuclear unit Marriage is a socially approved presumably long­term sexual and economic union  between a man and a woman. It involves reciprocal rights and obligations between  spouses and between parents and children.  Foraging Societies ­ Nomadic groups of 100 or fewer people ­ Gendered division of labour exists among foragers; men hunt and women gather  wild, edible plants ­ Women also do most of the childcare  ­ Research done on these societies show that men often tend to babies and children;  in some cases, women hunt ­ Thus gendered division of labour is less strict than functionalists assume ­ These divisions of labour don’t necessarily mean any imbalances in authority or  power because women produce up to 80% of the food ­ In foraging societies, relations between sexes is quite egalitarian, parent’ don’t  view children just as an investment in the future, cooperative band members  execute most economic and socialization functions in public The Canadian Middle class in the 1950s ­ During the Great Depression, Canadians were forced to postpone marriage due to  poverty, government imposed austerity, and physical separation ­ Immediate postwar era was one of unparalleled optimism and prosperity ­ Real per capita income rose, % of Canadians owning homes, employment and  personal income reached all time highs ­ Jobs created in World War II for women were rescinded because it was expected  that they’d return to the “normal” role of women’s housewife roles and men as  providers ­ Conditions resulted in “marriage boom” The marriage/divorce rate is the number of marriages/divorces that occur in a year for  every 1000 people in the population. ­ Functionalists ignored the degree to which (1) the traditional nuclear family is  based on gender inequality and (2) changes in power relations between women  and men have altered family structures in recent decades Summing Up 2 • Functionalists believe that the nuclear family is ideally suited to promoting the  necessary social functions of sexual regulation, economic cooperation,  reproduction, socialization, and emotional support. • Evidence from foraging societies questions functionalist beliefs about the  importance of gender inequality, investment in children, and the private pursuit of  socialization and economic functions. • The growing predominance of the nuclear family in the immediate post­World  War II years occurred in response to an unusual set of social conditions. The big  picture from the early twentieth century to the present is that of a declining  nuclear family. CONFLICT AND FEMINIST THEORIES  ­ Idea of power relations between women and men explain prevalence of different  family forms was first suggested by Marx’s close friend and coauthor, Friedrich  Engels ­ He argued that nuclear families emerged with inequalities in wealth ­ When wealth was concentrated in the hands of man, he’d become concerned with  how to transmit his wealth to his children, especially his sons ­ He could safely do this only if he controlled his wife sexually and economically ­ Economic control ensures that the man’s property can’t be squandered and would  remain his; sexual control, through enforcing female monogamy, ensures that his  property will be transmitted only to his offspring  ­ Engels thus states that elimination of private property and creation of economic  equality – otherwise known as communism – could end gender inequality and  traditional nuclear family ­ He was right to note long history of economic and sexual domination in the  traditional nuclear family though wrong to think communism would solve gender  inequality ­ Only a gender revolution could shatter patterns that make possible the  emancipation of women Summing Up • Conflict theorists see the proliferation of non­nuclear families as a response to  changes in power relations between women and men.  POWER AND FAMILIES Love and Mate Selection ­ Most of us view marriage devoid of love as tragic ­ In most societies through human history, love had little to do with marriage ­ Marriage was arranged by third parties based mainly on calculations intended to  maximize their families’ prestige, economic benefits, and political advantages 3 ­ Idea of love being important in the choice of marriage partner first gained  currency in 18  century England with the rise of liberalism and individualism,  philosophies stressing freedom of the individual over community welfare th ­ Intimate linkage of love and marriage promoted heavily in early 20  century  through Hollywood advertising self­gratification on a grand scale Social Influences on Mate Selection ­ The biggest change in mate selection is taking place online ­ The first online dating site service started ~1996, without only 7% of Internet  users visiting; By 2009, the figure rose to 30% ­ Though online dating increases the number and range of potential mates people  have access to, social forces continue to influence mate selection ­ Some dating sites cater to Christians, Muslims, Jews, etc.  ­ Three sets of social forces influence whom you’re likely to fall in love with and  marry 1. Potential spouses bring resources to the “marriage market” that they use to  attract mates and compete against rivals  Resources include financial assets, status, values, tastes, and  knowledge 2. Since marriage between people from different groups may threaten the  cohesion of one or both groups, third parties often intervene to prevent  marriages outside the group  Families, neighbourhoods, communities, and religious institutions  raise young people to identify with groups they are members of  and apply sanctions to young people who threaten to marry outside  the group   Ethnic intermarriage is becoming increasingly comm
More Less

Related notes for SOCA02H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit