Textbook Notes (368,242)
Canada (161,733)
Sociology (1,053)
SOCA02H3 (310)
Chapter 21

Sociology Chapter 21 notes.docx

6 Pages
166 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOCA02H3
Professor
Sheldon Ungar
Semester
Winter

Description
           Chapter 21: Collective Action and Social Movements  Collective action occurs when people act in unison to bring about or resist  social, political and economic change.    There are two type of collective action: 1. “Routine” collective action: Tends to be non­violent and follow  established patterns of behavior in bureaucratic social structures. For  instance, when Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) lobbies for  tougher laws against driving under the influence of alcohol or when  workers form a union, they are engaging in routine collective action.    2. “Non­routine” collective action: Tends to be short­lived and violent.  They may for example form mobs and engage in riots.  A.E. Fowler led the Vancouver Riot of 1907. Fowler was secretary of the  Asiatic Exclusion League, an organization of white trade unionists who were  trying to convince the American and Canadian governments to keep  Chinese, Japanese, Hindus and Sikhs out of North America.  The following are some facts about the riot: • Occurred on September 7, 1907 • Members of the riot went into Vancouver’s Chinatown and threw  rocks on store windows and brutally beat and stabbed the Chinese.  • After the riot in Chinatown, the mob then moved on to the Japanese  Quarter a few blocks away to carry on the violence.  • The local news put the blame on foreign influence (mainly the US  since Fowler was American) for the riot, thereby arguing that the riot  did not result from local social conditions.   Pre­1970 Sociological theories argued that three conditions must be met for  non­routine collective actions, such as the 1907 Vancouver Riot, to emerge. • A group of people must be marginally or poorly integrated into  society. • Their norms must be strained or disrupted. • They must lose their capacity to act rationally by getting caught up in  the supposedly inherent madness of crowds.  These three factors together make up what is known as the breakdown  theory of collective action which states that social movements emerge  when traditional norms and patterns of social organization are disrupted.  The following are expanded explanations for the three factors mentioned  above: 1. The discontent of poorly integrated people: Breakdown theorists often  single out socially marginal, outside agitators as a principle cause of riots  and other forms of collective actions. 2. The Violation of norms: According to Breakdown theorists, Asian­      Canadian cultural practices were violations of fundamental Anglo­Canadian  norms. The word Strain refers to breakdowns in traditional norms that  precede collective action. In addition, Absolute deprivation is a condition  of extreme poverty and Relative deprivation is an intolerable gap between  the social rewards people expect to receive and those they actually receive.  3. The inherent irrationality of crowd behavior. Gustave Le Bon, a French  interpreter of crowd behavior, argued that people in crowds are often able to  perform extraordinarily and sometimes outrageous acts. Sociologists called  Le Bon’s argument the Contagion theory of crowd behavior. Contagion is  the process by which extreme passions supposedly spread rapidly through a  crowd like a contagious disease.  After 1970, Sociologists have uncovered flaws in all three elements of  breakdown theory: 1. The discontent of poorly integrated people: The parade of 7000 to  9000 people who marched the city to hear Fowler’s hate speech was  organized locally by Vancouver trade unionists, ex­service men and  clergymen. The idea that the riot was caused mostly by foreigners and  not so much by local Canadians is clearly not true. 2.  The Violation of norms: Although Asian immigration upset many  Anglo­Canadians in Vancouver, the roots of the 1907 riot ran deeper  than the violation of their cultural norms. This hatred was due to the  spilt labor market. The Chinese were willing to work for lesser pay  than the white Canadians for the same jobs thus creating racist  attitudes in the locals.  3. The inherent irrationality of crowd behavior: The Vancouver branch of  the Asiatic Exclusion League had been formed than a month earlier  and held three meetings before September 7. The route for the parade  was carefully mapped out. In other words, sophisticated planning  went into organizing the day’s events.  Post 1970 Sociologists focused on the Solidarity Theory, which states that  social movements emerge when potential members can mobilize resources,  take advantage of new political opportunities and avoid high levels of social  control by authorities (government reactions to protest influence subsequent  protest). Resource mobilization is the process by which groups engage in more  collective action as their power increases because of their growing size and  increasing organizational, material and other resources.  Discussions of strain, social
More Less

Related notes for SOCA02H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit