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SOCB26H3 (17)
Chapter 2

SOCB26 Chapter 2

7 Pages
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Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOCB26H3
Professor
Julian Tanner

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CHAPTER 2: CLASSICAL SOCIOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO EDUCATION
Introduction: Using Theory to Study Schools
Theories: conceptual tools that provide perspective or illumination
oMacro/grand theories: attempt to understand vast horizons across entire
societies
oMiddle range theories: propositions that are geared toward specific times
and places
oMicro-level theories: concerned with face-to-face interactions among
people and broader social forces (partially)
Durkheim and Socialization: The Cultural Shift to Individualism
INDIVIDUALISM (DURKHEIM): A belief in the importance and virtue of self
development and self reliance and personal independence
Religion had traditionally supplied the norms that prescribed social behaviour
Industrialization and democratic reforms had sparked greater individualism
People were encouraged to develop their individual talents and capacities to their
fullest extent
Response about social cohesion:
oArgued against individual rationality, or a social contract, as the basis for
society
Social norms were essential to providing a moral framework the
basis of enduring trust within which mutual agreements can be
reached
Contract partners 1st need trust (key ingredient in social cohesion),
which is pre-contractual, which is then followed by the contract
The signing of contracts and all other acts of mutual reciprocity,
presuppose this context of trust
oTrust comes from individuals interacting with one another
www.notesolution.com
Our sense of self is assembled from the reactions of others
Our reliance on others provides a moral basis for social cohesion
oMutual understanding is possible only by using a common language that
we didnt invent
Language is a microcosm of society, an example of the social rules
and resources that constitute society
Framework has a dual role:
enables us to act in accordance to the framework (e.g.
conversational etiquette)
constrains us by restricting the range of approved actions
(e.g. no cheating on exams)
education is a continuous effort to impose on the child ways of seeing, feeling,
and acting at which he/she wouldnt have arrived at spontaneously Durkheim
Durkheims lectures on moral education:
oMorals had an imperative quality, stipulating how one should act
A system of rules and action that predetermine conduct
oActing morally entailed some appreciation for the well-being of others
To act in the light of collective interest
oActing morally meant taking personal responsibility
Have as clear and complete an awareness as possible of the reasons
for our conduct
Education must stress students learning a system of rules that should benefit
society (thecollective interest)
He saw socialization as complex and involving an important reciprocity between
the individual and society
Schools were to teach students to be socially responsible, to internalize their
obligation to the larger community
www.notesolution.com

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Description
CHAPTER 2: CLASSICAL SOCIOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO EDUCATION Introduction: Using Theory to Study Schools Theories: conceptual tools that provide perspective or illumination o Macrogrand theories: attempt to understand vast horizons across entire societies o Middle range theories: propositions that are geared toward specific times and places o Micro-level theories: concerned with face-to-face interactions among people and broader social forces (partially) Durkheim and Socialization: The Cultural Shift to Individualism INDIVIDUALISM (DURKHEIM): A belief in the importance and virtue of self development and self reliance and personal independence Religion had traditionally supplied the norms that prescribed social behaviour Industrialization and democratic reforms had sparked greater individualism People were encouraged to develop their individual talents and capacities to their fullestextent Response about social cohesion: o Argued against individual rationality, or a social contract, as the basis for society Social norms were essential to providing a moral framework the basis of enduring trust within which mutual agreements can be reached Contract partners 1 need trust (key ingredient in social cohesion), which is pre-contractual, which is then followed by the contract The signing of contracts and all other acts of mutual reciprocity, presuppose this context of trust o Trust comes from individuals interacting with one another www.notesolution.com
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