Textbook Notes (380,861)
CA (168,245)
UTSC (19,296)
Sociology (1,063)
SOCB26H3 (17)
Chapter 3

SOCB26 Chapter 3

15 Pages
193 Views

Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOCB26H3
Professor
Julian Tanner

This preview shows pages 1-3. Sign up to view the full 15 pages of the document.
CHAPTER 3: CONTEMPORARY SOCIOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO
SCHOOLING
Introduction: Changing Contexts for Schooling
Daniel Bell
-linked great societal changes to massive shifts in peoples work; great economic
revolutions
-late 20th century the 3rd revolution post-industrial revolution aka
information/knowledge society had begun
-Based on human professional service sector (e.g. communication, sales,
government)
-Predicted shifts in the location of peoples work and in its essential content
otheoretical knowledge would be more central to ppls job especially when
comparing service-sector jobs to agricultural or industrial jobs
oimportance of innovation, research and development and smart
technologies
opredicted the as computer the driving force in the contemporary period
Nico Stehr
-knowledge = the key source of economic growth, defining contemporary society;
the knowledge society
-modern innovation depend increasingly on the pure research of university
scholars
-politicians are strong in building bridges between education, knowledge and the
economy
-with increasing global competition policy makers have been quick to point to
education as a producer and disseminator of knowledgeas critical to national
success
Clement & Myles
www.notesolution.com
-the net result of the shift to services has been to increase the requirements for
people to think on the job
-more jobs require autonomy, cognitive complexity and dexterity
-a key consequence of this shift: a persons level of education shapes their
economic rewards: ever-higher levels of schooling = increasingly high earnings for
more educated individuals
-These economic changes have been accompanied by great cultural and
demographic shifts
-one shift has been the continual decline of religious authority
-early university charters (John Meyers term for) societys granting of
authority to schools which in turn gives their graduates a recognized
status were awarded to institutions with strong religious ties
-Religion now plays far less of a role if any in socializing most young Canadians
odecline in religion has helped alter the cultural underpinnings of modern
life
-Culture is about peoples taken for granted social conventions—the principles of
action, the habits of speech and gesture, and the recipes or scenarios about how
to act
-Culture: peoples cultural tool kit: a set of guidelines or social rules that range
from turn taking in conversations, queuing or dressing to much deeper social
mores
-(Durkheim and Weber): the continual erosion of religion has given rise to a new
set of values, one marked by rising individualism: a belief in the importance
and virtue of self-development, self-reliance, and personal
independence and less deferential attitudes
Ronald Inglehart
-Newer generations are exposed to economic prosperity and receive more
education, they undergo a vale shift = emphasis on self-development, personal
identity and unlimited expression
www.notesolution.com
-For liberals, individualism is positive, part of a greening of our culture,
strengthening values of liberty and equality (self-help, self-realization and self-
identity movements) = new lifestyle foci
-For conservatives, individualism is negative, eroding traditional values of
authority, respect, trust and honesty
-Parenting has become hard work requiring skill and commitment to ensure the
survival and success of children
-The prolongation of childhood = the socializing of young children supplemented
outside the family through education, health, and daycare systems
-Increasingly school material competes with popular entertainment, advertising
and clothing which has been criticized as industries of diversion and weapons of
mass destruction
-Changes in family form:
oIn 1959 (baby boom) more babies were born in Canada than any year
oFamily forms shifted, the traditional nuclear family (mom + dad + kids)
declined
oCommon-law unions, 2 working parents, divorce
oSchools accustomed to teaching children of recent immigrants
oGrand religious traditions are being replaced by new ideals
oModern teens can choose among greater diversity of lifestyles offered by
industries that in seeking their market share make school a less central
priority for many youth
oSmaller modern families place pressures on children to succeed since few
siblings are available to shoulder parents dreams
Socialization
-Has been a core feature of modern schooling
-Oldest contemporary tradition that of structural functionalism
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
CHAPTER 3: CONTEMPORARY SOCIOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO SCHOOLING Introduction: Changing Contexts for Schooling Daniel Bell - linked great societal changes to massive shifts in peoples work; great economic revolutions th rd - late 20 century the 3 revolution post-industrial revolution aka informationknowledge society had begun - Based on human professional service sector (e.g. communication, sales, government) - Predicted shifts in the location of peoples work and in its essential content o theoretical knowledge would be more central to ppls job especially when comparing service-sector jobs to agricultural or industrial jobs o importance of innovation, research and development and smart technologies o predicted the as computer the driving force in the contemporary period Nico Stehr - knowledge = the key source of economic growth, defining contemporary society; the knowledge society - modern innovation depend increasingly on the pure research of university scholars - politicians are strong in building bridges between education, knowledge and the economy - with increasing global competition policy makers have been quick to point to education as a producer and disseminator of knowledgeas critical to national success Clement & Myles www.notesolution.com- the net result of the shift to services has been to increase the requirements for people to think on the job - more jobs require autonomy, cognitive complexity and dexterity - a key consequence of this shift: a persons level of education shapes their economic rewards: ever-higher levels of schooling = increasingly high earnings for more educated individuals - These economic changes have been accompanied by great cultural and demographic shifts - one shift has been the continual decline of religious authority - early university charters (John Meyers term for) societys granting of authority to schools which in turn gives their graduates a recognized status were awarded to institutions with strong religious ties - Religion now plays far less of a role if any in socializing most young Canadians o decline in religion has helped alter the cultural underpinnings of modern life - Culture is about peoples taken for granted social conventionsthe principles of action, the habits of speech and gesture, and the recipes or scenarios about how to act - Culture: peoples cultural tool kit: a set of guidelines or social rules that range from turn taking in conversations, queuing or dressing to much deeper social mores - (Durkheim and Weber): the continual erosion of religion has given rise to a new set of values, one marked by rising individualism: a belief in the importance and virtue of self-development, self-reliance, and personal independence and less deferential attitudes Ronald Inglehart - Newer generations are exposed to economic prosperity and receive more education, they undergo a vale shift = emphasis on self-development, personal identity and unlimited expression www.notesolution.com
More Less
Unlock Document


Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit