Textbook Notes (381,202)
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SOCB26H3 (17)
Chapter 4

SOCB26 Chapter 4

5 Pages
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Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOCB26H3
Professor
Julian Tanner

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CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION REVOLUTIONAIZED: THE GROWTH OF MODERN
SCHOOLING
Introduction
The 20th century gave birth to a worldwide schooling revolution, with formal
education evolving from a patchwork of loosely connected practices into a
universal, institutionalized process embracing the entire citizenry
Beginnings of a Schooled Society
Defining attributes of the modern school class:
oMost students in a class are the same age
oClasses are organized by knowledge level
oClasses meet in separate locations
oA class is often set off by a particular time period
The school class was 1st organized by level of knowledge (16th century)
oSchool classes were initially organized by ability, not age
Todays classes are age-graded classes organized by age (19th century)
oFear of promoting young students too rapidly
Rushing and mixing students of different temperaments
Older students discouraged from remaining too long at the same
grade level (feel out of place and drop out)
3 Rs: reading,riting, andrithmetic
Prentices hypotheses about the transition from informal to formal schooling:
oEconomic/industrialization: to ensure a skilled and compliant labour
force was available (e.g. Bowles and Gintis)
Criticism: causality mass schooling was prior to large-scale
industrialization
www.notesolution.com
oTechnical complexity: to ensure young people had the rudimentary skills
essential for success in a world growing more complex (e.g. Davis and
Moore)
Criticism: no historical suggestion of technical necessity as prime
educational motivator
oChild susceptibility in a diverse world: to provide a venue to ensure
children adopted a common value system (e.g. Durkheim)
Support: children were finally understood as different from adults;
they werent just young adults
oNation-building: schooling was part of a larger process of building an
independent country (e.g. Weber, Meyer)
Concern about diverse values:
Political instability 1837 Rebellion - fear of divisiveness and
factionalism that could undermine the prosperity of a
fledgling nation
End of 19th century larger immigration waves form Europe
meant that attention had to be given to social cohesion
Support: schooling was an effective way to build a better society,
instilling in everyone, regardless of social class, common values and
a strong work ethic
Especially between various interest groups (e.g. English,
French, Aboriginal all differed in religion, language, etc.)
Enrolments and Attendance: Creating a Universal Experience
Post-Second World War a new mindset emerged among policy-makers in Canada:
education as an economic engine for the nation
Emerging trends:
oThe completion of elementary years became universal
oHigh school graduation became a benchmark to be attained by all
www.notesolution.com

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Description
CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION REVOLUTIONAIZED: THE GROWTH OF MODERN SCHOOLING Introduction The 20 thcentury gave birth to a worldwide schooling revolution, with formal education evolving from a patchwork of loosely connected practices into a universal, institutionalized process embracing the entire citizenry Beginnings of a Schooled Society Defining attributes of the modern school class: o Most students in a class are the same age o Classes are organized by knowledge level o Classes meet in separate locations o A class is often set off by a particular time period st th The school class was 1 organized by level of knowledge (16 century) o School classes were initially organized by ability, not age th Todays classes are age-graded classes organized by age (19 century) o Fear of promoting young students too rapidly Rushing and mixing students of different temperaments Older students discouraged from remaining too long at the same grade level (feel out of place and drop out) 3 Rs: reading, riting, and rithmetic Prentices hypotheses about the transition from informal to formal schooling: o Economicindustrialization: to ensure a skilled and compliant labour force was available (e.g. Bowles and Gintis) Criticism: causality mass schooling was prior to large-scale industrialization www.notesolution.com
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