Chapter 31.doc

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Department
Women's and Gender Studies
Course
WSTA01H3
Professor
Anissa Talahite- Moodley
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 31: ‘Talk about Strenuous Hockey’ : Violence, Manhood, and the 1907 Ottawa Silver Seven – Montreal Wanderer Rivalry - contrary to some popular opinion that hockey violence is growing worse, violence has been a central part of hockey culture for more than a century Hockey, Class, and Manliness - with the development of industrial capitalism and the emergence of an entrepreneurial and professional middle class during the nineteenth century, men increasingly perceived their gender identity in relation to individual achievement and economic success in the marketplace - the emergence of modern hockey was tied to conceptions of middle-class amateurisms and ‘respectable’ middleclass masculinity - violence in hockey addressed a social need in helping Canadians to define and develop a meaningful masculinity - although the persistence of physicality and aggression in hockey seemed to contradict the ideals of respectability at the heart of middle-class manliness, this affinity for violence is understandable in the context of a developing model of masculinity that cut across class lines - ‘primitive’ elements in sports like hockey helped counter the fear that over-civilization was making men weak, effeminate, and over-sophisticated - at the same time, the cross-class appeal of an aggressive masculinity based on force and danger helps to explain the popularity of ‘strenuous’, even ‘brutal’, hockey among middle-class players and spectators Conclusion − this study has analyzed contradictory media
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