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Chapter 13

FAH101H1 Chapter Notes - Chapter 13: Giovanni Battista Piranesi


Department
Art
Course Code
FAH101H1
Professor
Dr.Sharon Vattay
Chapter
13

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÷pInterior wood paneling enriched by carving, gilding, painting or inlay
÷p×lso known as gilded woodwork

÷pall ornaent cobining fors based on water worn rocks, plants, shells
÷pcharacteristic of the 18th century Rococo period
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÷pRepresentation of fors of seashells used as a decorative carving over doors,
windows and in friezes and architraves
÷p×lso known as coquillage

÷ptyle of architecture and decoration (1720-1790)
÷p0riarily French in origin
÷pRepresents the final phase of the Baroque
÷p^travagantly or ecessively ornate stucco work
÷pcobo of the French Y, eaning stone, and , eaning shell, due to
reliance on these objects as otifs of decoration
÷pIn France, the Rococo was priarily a style for interiors, typified by the work of J. ×.
Meissonier (1965-1750)
÷p-ew aterials, new technologies and new systes of construction would radically
alter traditional building fors and would ake copletely new building types
possible
÷pForces of -eo-classicis and the Industrial Revolution led to an equally forceful
countercurrent: Roanticis
÷pFor any, -eo-classicis was too precise, too predictable and to eotionless
÷pFor others, the Industrial Revolution brought not progress, but ugliness, brutality
and nubing saeness
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÷poe ^nglish architects were turning away fro the style of Wren, Vanbrugh and
Hawksoor in favor of sipler approach they found in the works of ×ndrea 0alladio
÷peaders of this -eo-0alladian oveent
Ôpcolen capbell (1676-1729), cottish architect and editor of influential book
Vitruvius Britannicus
ÔpRichard Boyle, third ^arl of Burlington (1694-1753), wealthy noblean who
practiced as an architect in addition to fulfilling governent duties
ÔpWillia Kent (1685-1748), an ^nglishan who originally trained in Roe as a
painter and branched out into architecture and landscape design under the
patronage of ord Burlington

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÷pcolen capbell ay well have been responsible for converting ord Burlington to
the cause of 0alladio
÷pcapbell designed a near replica of the Villa Rotonda at a slightly larger scale, which
was Mereworth castle (1723) in Kent. He attached 4 ionic porticos to a siple cube
and crowned it with a pyraidal roof and doe
÷pord Burlington returned to Italy in 1719 to study the buildings of 0alladio. There he
et Willia Kent and they began a lifetie of friendly collaboration
÷pWith Kent͛s assistance in landscape design and interior detailing, ord Burlington
designed his own variation of Villa Rotonda at chiswick House (1725-29)
÷pchiswick is a saller version of the 0alladian original enlivened by a certain aount
of creative borrowing fro various sources. It has 1 portico instead of 4
÷pord Burlington used chiswick to house his architectural library and provide space
for entertainents, he actually lived in an adjacent building that was attached to the
new villa only at one corner
÷p×fter 1730, Kent began to practice architecture on his own, designing Holkha Hall
in -orfolk in 1734 which is uch larger than the villas of 0alladio
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÷p×rchitects of the -eo-classical period sought an accurate understanding of ancient
buildings
÷puring 18th century, publications of easured drawings of ancient sites greatly
epanded the available inforation relating to architectural history
÷pReains of Greek colonial town of 0aestu were closely eained, and Roan
cities of Herculaneu and 0opeii were discovered during road construction in
kingdo of -aples
÷p^cavations began at Herculaneu in 1735 and at 0opeii in 1748, freeing the
buildings fro volcanic ash and ud that had buried both sites during eruption of
Mount Vesuvius in 79 ×
÷pInterest in antiquity was not confined to classical civilizations of Greece and Roe
÷pHistorical info docuented through drawings of ancient buildings provided
designers with a greater repertoire of artistic styles than ever before and 18th
century publications ade possible the freedo in design that led to 19th century
eclecticis
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÷p1720-1778
÷peading eponent of -eo-classicis in Italy and prooter of ancient Roan
architecture
÷pKnown for his 3000 or so engravings of architectural subjects
÷pFro id 1750͛s till the end of his life, he issued a series of engravings titled [
 or Views of Roe ] views of ancient ruins which inspired any
architectural students
÷pFascinated by the grandeur that had once been ancient Roe
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÷p^nglishan Willia chabers knew hi and the great arches of chabers
oerset House in ondon deonstrate 0iranesi͛s lasting influence
÷pRobert ×da becae a close copanion of 0iranesi in Roe
÷p×da was inspired by 0iranesi͛s over iaginative depictions of ornaental designs
in developing a style of interior decoration in ^ngland that becae known as
͞×daesque͟
÷pMver tie, 0iranesi͛s work becae ore and ore eclectic
÷pHis work illuinates 2 ajor and copeting currents in 18th century art and
architecture: -eo-classicalis and Roanticis

÷p1728-1792
÷pcottish born, and traveled to Roe where he befriended 0iranesi
÷pevoted his attention to what little was known about ancient residential design and
interior detailing ] realized that his architectural practice would rely on clients who
required hoes, not teples or churches, based on the classical styles
÷p×das claied, and probably rightly, that his elegant reduced decorations brought
about a revolution in ^nglish architectural taste
÷p×delphi (1768-72)
Ôpocated on Thaes river in ondon
Ôp0artially deolished in the 1930͛s but a few pieces still reain
Ôpconsisted of brick town houses with stone and terracotta tri
ÔpMiicking a typical palatial (splendid and palace like) façade as it had central
and end pavilions and tall façade proportions
ÔpInterior decoration was siilar to eterior, with Greek vine otifs on wall
÷pWillias-Wynn House
Ôpocated in ondon (1722)
Ôpeonstrates his skillful planning and etraordinary syste of interior design
ÔpMn a long narrow site, he arranged a variety of different roo shapes to ake
everything fit including rectangles, polygons, apsidal and double apsidal roos
(×pse = seicircular/polygonal space, ostly in a church, intended to have an alter)
ÔpÚsed stucco ornaent
ÔpIntroduced colors taken fro ecavations at Herculaneu and 0opeii
÷p×das claied, and probably rightly, that his elegant reduced decorations brought
about a revolution in ^nglish architectural taste
÷puton Hoo
Ôpocated in Bedfordshire, ^ngland
ÔpBuilt in 1767-69 but daaged by fires and rebuilt twice in the 19th century
Ôp×da believed the eterior to be plain
ÔpHad a central teple front in front of a 0antheon-like doe
Ôp0riary circulation occurs along cross aes with longitudinal ais passing
through an elongated circle, a rotunda (round building usually with a doe)
with a ring of interior coluns
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