Textbook Notes (368,611)
Canada (162,009)
Economics (479)
ECO220Y1 (33)
Chapter 11

ECO220Y1 Chapter 11 Notes
Premium

4 Pages
98 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
ECO220Y1
Professor
Jennifer Murdock
Semester
Fall

Description
ECO220Y1 Textbook Notes Chapter 11: Confidence Intervals for Proportions • Goal is to look at a sample proportion and make an inference about the population  in general. o Can’t look at two different samples, as they will almost most definitely  vary. 11.1 A Confidence Interval • Using  p  and the SE of a sample mean, we can state an interval of confidence  in which we are _% confident p is within the interval. o I.e. if  p  = 0.15 and SE( p¿=0.011 , we can state “We are 95% sure  that p will be within 2SE’s above and below 0.15.” • Things we would like to say and reasons why most cannot be said (using  p  =  0.15): o “15.0% of all adults thought the economy was improving.”  Cannot make an absolute statement because chances are, p, is not  exactly equal to  p  = 0.15.  Observations will vary. o “It’s probably true that 15.0% of all adults thought the economy was  improving.”  No, we can be pretty sure that p is not exactly 15.0%. o “We don’t know exactly what proportion of adults thought the economy  was improving, but we know that it’s within the interval 15.0%  ±  2 X  1.1%. That is, it’s between 12.8% and 17.2%.”  Cannot say for sure it is within the interval. o “We don’t know exactly what proportion of adults thought the economy  was improving, but we are reasonably sure that the interval from 12.8% to  17.2% contains the true proportion.”  Fudged twice by giving an interval and showing there is doubt  (“reasonably sure” is not know). o “We’re 95% confident that between 12.8% and 17.2% of adults thought  the economy was improving.”  Most appropriate interpretation that can be given, given our limited  knowledge about p. • Confidence interval: an interval of values, usually of the form  Estimate±Marginof error , found from data in such a way that a percentage of  all random samples can be expected to yield intervals that capture the true  parameter. • One­proportion z­interval: a confidence interval for the true value of a proportion.  The confidence interval is ̂p± z∗SE(p)̂       where z* is a critical value from the standard Normal model corresponding to        the specified confidence level. • When we say we are 95% confident that our interval contains the true proportion,  we are saying, “95% of samples of this size will produce confidence intervals that  capture the true proportion.” o Intervals will vary sample to sample; the true proportion will not change  however. o Can never be 100% certain whether your interval worked. 11.2 Margin of Error: Certainty vs. Precision • Margin of error (ME): in a confidence interval, the extent of the interval on either  side of the estimated parameter. A margin of error is typically the product of a  critical value from the sampling distribution and a standard error from the data. o A small margin of error corresponds to a confidence interval that pins  down the parameter precisely. o A large margin of error corresponds to a confidence interval that gives  relatively little information about the estimated parameter. o It was 2 SE’s in the example above. • The more confident we want to be, the larger the margin of error must be. o The choice of confidence is somewhat arbitrary, but you must choose the  level yourself. 11.3 Critic
More Less

Related notes for ECO220Y1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit