Textbook Notes (368,651)
Canada (162,033)
Economics (479)
ECO220Y1 (33)
Chapter 19

ECO220Y1 Chapter 19 Notes
Premium

4 Pages
103 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
ECO220Y1
Professor
Jennifer Murdock
Semester
Fall

Description
ECO220Y1 Textbook Notes Chapter 19: Understanding Regression Residuals 19.1 Examining Residuals for Groups • Looking at the residuals plotted against the explanatory (y) variable can help  uncover new information. • Look to see whether groups who’s residuals are high/low/0 share common  characteristics (i.e. cereal example with cereals separated by their shelf level). 19.2 Extrapolation and Prediction • Extrapolation: although linear models provide an easy way to predict values of y  for a given value of x, it’s unsafe to predict for values of x far from the ones used  to find the linear model equation. o This is called extrapolating. o Predicting values far away requires the assumption that the relationship  between x and y will not change (not often the case). o When the x variable is time, we should be very wary of extrapolation. 19.3 Unusual and Extraordinary Observations • Two ways a point can stand out: o Outlier: a data point that stands away from the regression line by having a  large residual is called an outlier. o Leverage: data points whose x­values are far from the mean of x are said  to exert leverage on a linear model.  They can pull the line close to them, sometimes completely  determining the slope and intercept.  Points with a high enough leverage can have deceptively small  residuals.  They may lie on the line that best fits the other data points but this  2 will enhance the r and  R  values. • When a high­leverage point exists, two regression lines should be fit to the data,  one with and one without it. o Influence: if omitting a point from the data changes the regression model  substantially, the point is considered influential. 19.4 Working with Summary Values • Scatterplots of statistics summarized over groups tend to show less variability  than we’d see if we measured the same variables on individuals. o I.e. means vs. normal data points o They exhibit less scatter than the individuals they are based on. o Will result in higher correlations for the statistics. • Lesson: do not think that since lines fit the statistics very well that they will fit the  individual points just as well. 19.5 Autocorrelation • Data points collected at the same point in time will be related. • When values at time t are correlated with values at time t – 1, they are said to be  autocorrelated. o When values are correlated with points two periods back, it is said that  second­order autocorrelation is present. • Autocorrelation is a violation of an assumption for regression. • Durbin­Watson statistic: allows us to test for autocorrelation. Calculated by  summing the squares of the differences between consecutive residuals and  dividing by its expected value under the null of no autocorrelation. n 2 ∑ (et−e t−1) D= t=2 n 2 ∑ e t t=1 where  et  is the residual at time t. The statistic always falls in the interval from  0 to 4. o When the null is true, D should be 2. • Outcomes when testing for positive autocorrelation: o If D  4 – d ,Lthen there is evidence of negative autocorrelation o If 4 – d L
More Less

Related notes for ECO220Y1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit