Textbook Notes (368,011)
Canada (161,561)
English (65)
ENG353Y1 (1)
Chapter

ENG353Y1: "Surfacing" by Margaret Atwood

4 Pages
102 Views
Unlock Document

Department
English
Course
ENG353Y1
Professor
Vikki Visvis
Semester
Fall

Description
Surfacing: By Margaret Atwood Themes Language as a Connection to Society: ● The use of language is a recurring theme throughout the book ● When the narrator becomes mentally ill, one of the symptoms is the inability to speak or communicate to others with words, or to understand others speaking ● This is symbolic of her lost connection with society, as language is the social glue that binds society together ● Without it, you are unable to communicate with anyone, or participate as a normalized citizen ● Her inability to speak or understand David is symbolic of the distance between her and societal norms as she strays farther and farther away from reality ● That she is rejecting something as common as the human language is, in a way, her subconscious attempt at rejecting the human society as a whole ● This is evident in her admiration for animals, and their ability to recognize plants without knowing their name ● That she relates more to these animals than her own kind is an indicator of her separation from society ● She also vows to never teach her child language ● Eventually she conquers her alienation by embracing language Women and Alienation: ● Atwood uses the narrator as a voice of commentary for alienation of all women in the world ● At the time, women had fewer rights and gender inequality was prevalent ● The theme of alienation is constant throughout the novel: the narrator feels alienated by the abandonment of her father, and the closed­offness of her mother ● She explains that alienation begins with gender differences taught at a young age ● Men are especially alienating in their views of women and what roles they must take one ● To Atwood, men are controlling towards their wives in all aspects (birth control, sex, marriage, language) ● A marriage to a man is similar to a war, and the women is always at fault ● Eventually the alienation felt by the narrator drives her to madness ● The fact that the narrator remains anonymous throughout the novel is suggestive that Atwood intended her to be an ambiguous representation of women around the world ­ that any woman reader could relate to the narrator since she did not have a name or context American expansion ● When it comes to Americans, Atwood’s descriptions of them are consistently negative ● She hints at the suggestion of American invasion for Canadian waters ● Deems them to be over­consumers, violent in behaviour, and lover of technology (foreshadowing to globalization?) ● The American ideology is portrayed as a disease (she actually uses the term “brain disease” to describe them) ● Their actions always come off as careless and imposing (they litter, install missiles, and kill for sport) ● The depiction of Americans as cultural infiltrators, is part of a common 
More Less

Related notes for ENG353Y1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit