Textbook Notes (368,501)
Canada (161,931)
Geography (186)
GGR107H1 (52)
Chapter 7

GGR107 Finals Notes_Chapter 7.docx

7 Pages
135 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Geography
Course
GGR107H1
Professor
Sarah Wakefield
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 7 The word “development” may have produced a bewildering array of labels for peole and places hat are not  considered “developed”. Morag Bell suggests that the word Third Word has lots of tragic stereotypes of  famine, poverty, drought, etc., to animate it and make it  seem coherent and defined. Labelling whole regions and spaces as “developing or “developed” reduces and overlooks the political,  economic, social and cultural diversity of the places and communities included within these gross  generalizations, simplifications an aggregations. It is important to grasp how places and peoples are spatially and socially differentiated  through development  and inequality, experiencing progress and goof change in a variety of ways Geography and the Third World • Labelling nations according to degree of development imposes negative uniformity. • All too often the “developing world” has been defined as a “problem” for the Western World  that can only be resolved with the intervention of Western experts, donor, technology or  ideology. • The “three worlds” schema is very much a Cold War conceptualization of space is strongly  associated with the global, social and political conflict between capitalism and communism,  between the USA and USSR, in the second half of the twentieth century. The term posited a  first world of advanced capitalism in Europe, the USA, Australia and Japan, a second world  of the socialist bloc and a third world made up of the countries that remained when the  supposedly significant spaces of the world had been accounted for. ­These mental maps or imagined geographies or inequality are often created where people  have no direct experience describing to or referring to. ­Subscribers to the three world system have been criticized for the simplicity of these  divisions and their failure to recognize diversity and difference within these spaces; the world  does not consist of a series of individual national economies in the way often suggested in the  UN and World Bank reports. ­there is an observation that the global capitalist actively produces the inequality and uneven  employment • For some, a big part of the  economic development and the wealth of the rich are directly  imported from the poor countries. ­key question is how long would the world economic system generate  inequality • Third world development partly represents a geographical imagining, a representation of a  better world, and a belief in the idea of correctable inequalities/injustices between nations,  states and regions and within existing global economic orders ­the term Third World also gives enormous power to Western Development to shape popular  perceprdons of Africa, Asia, or Latin America ­ the 3  world thus is defined by and becomes intelligible through the languages and  representation of the agencies and institutions of global development • The idea of development is still very much relevant in societies which proclaim themselves  to be “developed” • Human Development Index also formulated a sense of development or category for bot  developing and developed socities. ­under this definition, development can be depicted in a single measure, the UNDP Index. ­UNDP Index combines data by country on life expectancy, literacy, income, environmental  quality and political freedom. The study can show: 1.) that every country can reach the highest level of performance set in the “West” or         or have access to the purchasing power of the  upper income 2.) In the case of GNP per capita, the HDI does in many ways point to the growing        gaps between different areas of the world Conceptualizing development • Have taken quasi­mystical connotation ­sence that seeking to become developed has been constructed as an objective that is  unquestionably positive and beyond approach • Developmental thinking and the sum of total ideas about development, ideology and strategy  has been caught in a Western perception of reality. • Two prevailing thinking of development: modernization and dependency approaches. • Modernization. Often dualistic,  opposing traditional to modern life­styles, indigenous to  westernized, as if no country of citizen could belong to both categories ­started after the end of WW2 and after UN was established and conceptualizations of  development received a decisive stimulus. ­conceptualization of development has become more complicated and contested when new  states are formed after the end of colonialism and in the context of the Cold War between the  USA and the USSR ­observers wanted to paint a picture of modernization of underdeveloped peoples confined to  backwardness but torn between the appeal of communism and the prospect of Western  Modernization. ­trickle down effect development (capitalist development from urban­industrial/rural areas to  other regions) ­model suggests a number of stages exist in the national development of countries or cities  leading to a final stage that represents the culmination of the development process. ­geographers studied the trickling down of  development to underdevelopment nations and  found out that they can move briskly to  modern tempo of life within few years, whilst the  state would be the key monitor and broker of development ­Rostow’s (1960) theory (stage one of traditional society to stage 5 of  high mass  consumption. Rostows model devaluates and misterprets the traditional societies and the  advance stage is always the western modernization. ­Faulty in the philosophy: 1.) geographies and inequality development cannot be neatly summarized as a set of        prescriptive stages 2.) Failed to address importance of gender 3.) Failed to materialize among those who have been subjects of  modernization        projects. 4.) Assumes the development that development can be mimicked, copied and               replicated and should try to reproduce the development of US or UK for example 5.) It implies that there is nothing before the beginning of development in a        developing country that is worth retaining or recalling but only on a series of        deficiencies, absences, weaknesses and incapacities 6.)  very much based down top­down rather than bottom­up 7.)  Scale of modernization was also often a problem in that they assumed that big is          beautiful (large infrastructure) 8.)  Sometimes the school and practitioners also depoliticize development, making        few if any references to history and culture          ­Like many development theory, it ended with a creed, a set of principles about what                                        was to be done, and heavily invested faith in the goals of mass consumption and              westernization • The Dependency school: beyond core and periphery. Challenges modernization theory. It  emerged in the 1960s and 1970s challenged this notion of positive core­ periphery relations,  identifying instead exploitation between satellites and metropoles. ­comprised of those who are opposed to US post­war imperialism and allied in some way to  the movement of the “third worldism” ­commonly associated with with Latin America but also emerged in Africa, the Carribean and  the Middle East. ­Under the influence of Marx’s writings, Furtado (1964) and Santos (1974) drew attention to  the mode of incorporation of the each country into the world od capitalist system which they  view is the cause of the exploitation ­mostly associated with the work of Gunder Frank ­idea that the development of one area necessitates the underdevelopment of the another (eg.  Dependency on the core such as UK ad US increases the underdevelopment of satellites in  the periphery such as Latin America and Africa) ­based on  historical contexts  and argued that for example colonialism helped to put in place  a set of dependent relations between core and periphery  ­peripheral satellites encouraged to produce what they did not consume and consume what  that they did not produce ­believed that the obstables to development were structural, arising not from lack of will or  poor weather conditions but from entrenched pattens of global inequality and dependent  relations ­Faulty in philosophy: 1.) dependency seemed to preserve the dualistic and binary classification of the    world  into developed/underdeveloped 2.) lacked a clear statement of what development actually is  3.) Key criticisms directed at the dependistas were that theory represents a form of         economic determinism and also overlooks social and cultural variation within  developed and underdeveloped regions. 4.) The framework seemed to leave the simplistic impression of an evil genie who  organizes the system, loading the dice and making sure the same people win all the  time 5.) theorist seemed to  be calling for a delinking from the world capitalist economy at a  time when it is undergoing further globalization and economic integration  • Post­colonial theory (Said, 1993) See GGR107 Lecture 6 for more information Conceptualizing development • Crush (1995), points out that development is always forward looking and does not always  examine issues of historical and geographical context.  • It is particularly important to examine the significance of Empire in the making of  international development. • In the last 3 decades of the nineteenth century, European states thus added 10M million  square miles of territory and 150M people to their areas of control or `/5 of the earth’s land  surface and 1/10 of its people • Colonialism  has been variously interpreted as an economic process of unequal exchange, as  a political process aimed at administration and subordination od indigenous peoples, and as a  cultural process of imposing European superiority. ­According to dependency theorists, it was at this era that periphery was inerted and brought  into an expanding network of economic changes with the core of thw orld system. ­Origins of humanitarian concern concern to come to aid of distant other lay partly in  response to the practices of slavery in transatlantic world and to the expansion of colonial  settlement in the age of empire ­it elicited a metropolitan sense of responsibility ­colonialism development was based on concept of makeability of society and being heavily  conditioned by the dominance of evolutionary thinking ­Imperialism  was viewed as a cultural and economic necessity where colonies were  properties of  metropolitan countries and thus needed to be developed using lates methods  and ideas. Brings about the missionary zeal to civilize and modernize  (conditioned as well)  the colony in a number of ways. ­After 1945 and under US President Truman, underdevelopment became the incomplete and  embryonic form of development and the gap was seen as bridgeable only through an  acceleration of growth (Rist 1997).  Globally, development would have its tustees guiding  civilized nations that the capacity and the knowledge or expertise tor organize land, labor and  capital in the South on behalf of others. ­There is this paternal and parental style of relationship that was established through the  imperial encounter between the coloniz
More Less

Related notes for GGR107H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit