HIS109Y1 Chapter Notes -Renaissance Humanism, Scientific Revolution, Planetary System

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Published on 19 Apr 2013
School
UTSG
Department
History
Course
HIS109Y1
HIS109Y1
Western Civilizations: p. 493 - 515
& Vol. 2: p. 182 - 215
& Seminar 7 - The Scientific Revolution
November 14th/2012
Western Civilizations...
-science entails at least 3 things: a body of knowledge, a system of inquiry, and a
community of practitioners
-the scientific revolution established this method of inquiry as well as forming a society
of brilliant thinkers and patrons
-science was slow to work its way into popular understanding; it did not necessarily
undermine religion
-one of the most decisive breaks between the middle ages and the modern world
-behind the efforts to understand the natural world lay a universal conviction that the
natural world had been created by God
-renaissance humanism helped to prepare the ground for this revolution
-the energies that many humanists put into translating classical texts, many of which
discussed concepts of the natural world, made these ideas available to a wider
audience
-ie. the humanist rediscovery of works by Archimedes influenced modern scientists like
Galileo
-the renaissance also encouraged the collaboration of artists and intellectuals like
Leonardo da Vinci who was an artist and scientist
-the view of an earth centered universe was influenced by the work of Aristotle
-however by the late middle ages, many scientists had observed things which
contradicted this early Greek theory
-Copernicus proposed that the earth was neither stationary nor the center of the
planetary system
-his ideas contradicted years of astronomical thought but he still published “On the
Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres” in 1543
-Galileo became famous for his discoveries made with the telescope in 1609
-he found that the moon wasn’t smooth but had mountains and plains, features of an
earth like landscape
-he then took a position as a tutor for the Medicis
-many people saw Galileo’s work as heresy although Galileo argued that if the church
took a position in scientific affairs, it would lose some of its credibility
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Document Summary

Science entails at least 3 things: a body of knowledge, a system of inquiry, and a community of practitioners. The scientific revolution established this method of inquiry as well as forming a society of brilliant thinkers and patrons. Science was slow to work its way into popular understanding; it did not necessarily undermine religion. One of the most decisive breaks between the middle ages and the modern world. Behind the efforts to understand the natural world lay a universal conviction that the natural world had been created by god. Renaissance humanism helped to prepare the ground for this revolution. The energies that many humanists put into translating classical texts, many of which discussed concepts of the natural world, made these ideas available to a wider audience. Ie. the humanist rediscovery of works by archimedes influenced modern scientists like. The renaissance also encouraged the collaboration of artists and intellectuals like. Leonardo da vinci who was an artist and scientist.

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