standard documentation formats

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Department
Innis College Courses
Course
INI204Y1
Professor
Roger Riendeau
Semester
Fall

Description
STANDARD DOCUMENTATION FORMATS Different disciplines use their own systems to give information about so urces. Here are samples of the main systems, showing the kinds of information needed and some details of punctuation, typeface, and indentation. For more detailed advice, consult the manuals and websites mentioned below or use a genera l handbook such as Northey and Procter, Writer’s Choice (available at the U of T Bookstore and in campus libraries at LB 2369 N677). NOTE: The examples here are compressed into single spacing to fit on the sheet, but your papers should be double-spaced. Traditional Endnotes or Footnotes with Superscript Numbers Systems using small raised numbers are preferred in some humanities and some sciences because they don’t interrupt the paper itself. You will still use parentheses inside your sentences to gi ve page or line numbers for your primary text (the historical document or work of literature you’re analysing), giving a footnote or endnote only for the first such reference. The excerpt below follows the system set out in Turabian, Manual for Writers, 6th edition (LB2369 T8 1996). You may also want to consult the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition (Z253 C45 2003), or its online guide at www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html; look at the material on Humanities style. For more examples and further advice on such matters as handling second reference s to the same source, see the online version of this handout at www.utoronto.ca/writing/document.html. 1 When Hamlet protests to Gertrude, “Leave wringing of your hands” (3.4.35), he2is naming a universally recognizable gesture. As3Smith says, similar broad gestures are “the most direct way of indicating inner turmoil.”mporary actors still use this body movement, and Renaissance audiences would have recognized it as a signal for inner dist ress,s specifically for a condition the Elizabethan author Reynolds named “ague of the spirits.” 1 NOTES William Shakespeare, Hamlet, in Norton Introduction to Literature, 8th ed., ed. Alison Booth, J. Paul Hunter, Kelly J. Mays, and Jerome Beaty (New York: W.W. Norton, 2001), 996. Subsequent parenthetical citations will refer to this edition. John Smith, “Renovating Hamlet for Contemporary Audiences,” UTQ 67 (Summer 1998): 434. 3 4lisa Zubar, “Acting Now,” Termagant Society Online, http://www.nouniv.ca/terma/moral.html; accessed 22 August 2006. Joan Brown, The Renaissance Stage (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2000), 111. Peter Reynolds, The Player’s Chapbooke (1587); quoted in Aline Mahieu, Acting Shakespeare (London: Shaw, 2003), 69. BIBLIOGRAPHY Brown, Joan. The Renaissance Stage. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2000. Mahieu, Aline. Acting Shakespeare. London: Shaw, 2004. Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. In Norton Introduction to Literature, 8th ed., ed. Alison Booth, J. Paul Hunter, Kelly J. Mays, and Jerome Beaty. 941-1033. New York: W.W. Norton, 2001. Smith, John. “Renovating Hamlet for Contemporary Audiences,” UTQ 67 (Summer 1998): 431-42. Zubar, Alisa. “Acting Now.” Termagant Society Online. http://www.nouniv.ca/terma/moral.html. Accessed 22 August 2006. New MLA System: Parenthetical Author-Page References This streamlined format gives author and page in parentheses within the text of the paper, and then sets out full references in a Works Cited (or Works Consulted) list. Developed by th e Modern Language Association, it is now widely accepted in the humanities. See the latest edition of the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (LB 2369 G53). See also the MLA website at www.mla.org/publications/style_faq. When Hamlet protests to Gertrude, “Leave wringing of your hands” (3.4.24), he is naming a universally recognizable gesture. As Smith says, similar broad gestures are “the most direct way of indicating inner turmoil” (434). Contemporary actors still use this body movement (Zubar), and Renaissance audiences would have recognized it as a speci fic signal for inner distress (Brown 111), perhaps specifically for a condition the Elizabethan author Reynolds named “ague of the spirits” (qtd. in Mahieu 69). Works Cited Brown, Joan. The Renaissance Stage. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 2000. Mahieu, Aline. Acting Shakespeare. London: Shaw, 2004. Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. Norton Introduction to Literature. Ed. Alison Booth, J. Paul Hunter, Kelly J. Mays, and Jerome Beaty. 8th ed. New York: W.W. Norton, 2001. 941-1033. Smith, John. "Renovating Hamlet for Contemporary Audiences.” UTQ 67 (1998): 431-42. Zubar, Alisa. “Acting Now.” 31 Nov. 2002. Termagant Society Online. Accessed 22 Aug. 2006 . APA System: Parenthetical Author-Date References The social sciences and many sciences emphasize the author and date. The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 5th edition (BF76.7 A46 2001) sets out detailed rules for one common system. See also www.apastyle.org/elecref.html for updated advice on referencing Internet material. The APA system use s only initials for authors’ given names, no quotation marks, no angle brackets for U RLs, minimal capitalization for titles of books and articles, and italics for volume numbers as well as journal titles. Stri ct APA format gives page numbers only for actual quotations, not for paraphrases or summaries. However, many instructors prefer a modified system that gives page numbers for all references
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