MSE Notes - Mechanical Properties.docx

9 Pages
92 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Materials Science & Engineering
Course
MSE101H1
Professor
Scott Ramsay
Semester
Spring

Description
Mechanical Properties Tension Tests  ­specimen is deformed to fracture with a gradually increasing tensile load that is applied  uniaxially along the long axis of a specimen  ­output of the tensile test is recorded as load or force vs. elongation  ­load­deformation characteristics are dependent on specimen size  ­ex. It takes twice the load to produce the same elongation if the cross sectional area of  the specimen is doubled  ­to minimize these geometrical factors, load and elongation are normalized to respective  parameters of engineering stress and engineering strain  Engineering stress:  σ= F A o Engineering strain:  lf−l o ε= l 0 Compression Tests  ­similar manner to tensile test, except force is compressive so specimen contracts along  the direction of the stress  ­by convention, compressive force = negative  ­tensile tests are more common because they are easier to perform  ­compressive tests used when a material’s behavior under large and permanent strains is  desired such as manufacturing applications or when material is too brittle under tension  Shear and Torsional Tests  ­performed using a pure shear force like in figure below  ­shear strain is defined as tangent of the strain angle   Geometric Considerations of the Stress State  ­stresses computed act either parallel or perpendicular to planar faces of the bodies  represented in these illustrations  ­stress state is a function of the orientations of the planes upon which stresses are taken to  act  ­more complex stress state is present that consists of a tensile stress σ’ that acts normal to  the p­p’ plane  ­shear stress τ’ acts parallel to this plane  Equations for theses stresses:  2 σ'=σ(cosθ) τ =σ sinθcosθ Stress­Strain Behavior  σ=Eϵ ­constant of proportionality E = Young’s modulus  ­ modulus of elasticity: ceramics > metals > polymers  ­deformation in which stress and strain are proportional is called elastic deformation  ­greater the modulus, stiffer the material, smaller elastic strain resulting from application  of given stress  ­elastic deformation is nonpermanent  ­some materials have elastic portion of the stress­strain curve which is not linear  ­for this nonlinear behavior, either tangent or secant modulus is used  ­tangent modulus is taken as the slope of the stress strain curve at some specified level of  stress  ­secant modulus represents the slope of a secant drawn from origin to some given point  of the stress­strain curve  ­atomic scale: macroscopic elastic strain is manifested as small changes in interatomic  spacing and stretching of interatomic bonds  ­magnitude of elastic modulus is a measure of the resistance to separation of adjacent  atoms  ­modulus is proportional to slope of the interatomic force separation curve at equilibrium  spacing  ­modulus of elasticity diminishes for all but some of the rubber materials  ­shear stress and strain are proportional to each other through the equation:  τ=Gγ ­G is the shear modulus, slope of linear elastic region of the shear stress­strain curve  Anelasticity  ­it has been assumed before that upon release of the load the strain is totally recovered,  however is most engineering materials there is also a time­dependent elastic strain  component  ­upon load release, some finite time is required for compete recovery  ­time dependent elastic behavior is known as anelasticity  ­it is due to time­dependent microscopic and atomistic processes that are attendant to  deformation  ­metals: anelastic component is normally small and often neglected  ­however, for some polymeric materials this is called viscoelastic behavior  Elastic Properties of Materials  ­if the material is isotropic then Ex = Ey  ­parameter called Poisson’s Ratio is defined as the ratio of the lateral and axial strains  −ε x −ε y v= εz = εz ­theoretically for iotropic materials, Poisson’s ratio = ¼ ­maximum value for v is 0.50 (no net volume change)  ­for isotropic materials, shear and elastic moduli are related using:  E=2G(1+v) ­in most metals, G is roughly 0.4E  Mechanical Behavior of Metals  ­elastic deformation persists only to strains of about 0.005  ­as material deforms beyond this point, the stress is no longer proportional to strain  ­permanent (PLASTIC) deformation occurs  ­transition from elastic to plastic is a gradual one for most metals  ­plastic deformation corresponds to the breaking of bonds with original atom neighbors  and reforming bonds with new neighbors as large numbers of atoms or molecules move  relative to each other  Yielding  ­stress level which plastic deformation begins  ­for metals, the point of yielding may be determined as initial departure from linearity of  stress­strain curve  ­elastic plastic transition occurs abruptly in yield­point phenomenon ­at upper yield point, plastic deformation is initiated with an actual decrease in stress  ­yield stress is taken as average stress associated with lower yield point  ­magnitude of yield strength is measure of resistance to plastic deformation  Tensile Strength  ­tensile strength: stress at maximum of engineering stress­strain curve  ­corresponds to maximum stress that can be sustained by structure in tension ­if stress is applied and maintained, fracture will result  ­all deformation to this point is uniform throughout the narrow region of the tensile  specimen  ­at maximum stress a small constriction (neck) begins to form and all subsequent  deformation is confined at this neck  ­fracture strength = stress at fracture  Ductility  ­measure of degree of plastic deformation sustained at fracture  ­brittle: little or no plastic deformation upon fracture  ­may be expressed quantitatively as percent elongation or percent reduction in area  lf−l0 %EL= x100 0 ­depends on specimen gauge length  ­shorted initial length, greater the fraction of total elongation from neck  A oA f %RA= A x 100 0 ­percent reduction in area values are independent of initial length and area  ­brittle materials are considered to be those having fracture strain of less than 5%  Resilience  ­capacity of a material to absorb energy when it is deformed elastically and upon  unloading, to have this energy recovered  ­associated property is modulus of resilience U , r ich is the strain energy per unit  volume required to stress a material from an unloaded state up to point of yielding  εy U = σ∫ε r o Assuming a linear elas
More Less

Related notes for MSE101H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit