MSE Notes - Crystal and Polymer Structure .docx

22 Pages
63 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Materials Science & Engineering
Course
MSE101H1
Professor
Scott Ramsay
Semester
Spring

Description
Crystal Structures Definitions Crystalline material – one in which atoms are situated in a repeating or periodic array  over large atomic distances  Amorphous or noncrystalline material – long­range atomic order is absent  Polymorphous ­ crystallization into two or more chemically identical but  crystallographically distinct forms  Crystal structure ­ manner in which atoms, ions or molecules are spatially arranged  Lattice – three­dimensional array of points coinciding with atom positions  Coordination number – number of touching atoms  Atomic Packing Factor (APF) = volume of atoms in unit cell/total unit cell volume  Planar Packing Factor (PPF) = area of atoms per face/total face area  Linear Packing Factor (LPF) = length of atoms along direction/total length of direction Unit Cells  ­smallest repeating entity in a crystal structure  ­usually parallelepipeds or prisms  Metallic Crystal Structure  Face­Centered Cubic Crystal Structure (FCC)  ­atoms located at each of the corners and centers of all cube faces  ­example: copper, aluminum, silver, gold  ­spheres (ion cores) touch across a face diagonal  a=2R 2√ ­total of four atoms in a given unit cell  ­coordination number: 12  ­APF: 0.74  Body­Centered Cubic Crystal Structure (BCC)  ­atoms located at all eight corners and a single atoms in center  ­atoms touch along cube diagonals  4R a= √3 ­examples: chromium, iron, tungsten  ­two atoms per unit cell  ­coordination number: 8  ­APF: 0.68  Hexagonal Close­Packed Crystal Structure  ­top and bottom faces of unit cell consist of six atoms that form regular hexagons around  a center atom  ­another plane provides three additional atoms between top and bottom planes  ­six atoms total in each unit cell (1/6 of the 12 top and bottom corner atoms, ½ of each of  the top and bottom center atoms and the 3 interior atoms)  ­ideal c/a value is 1.633   ­coordination number: 12  ­APF: 074 (both same as FCC)  ­examples: cadmium, magnesium, titanium, zinc  Density Computations  nA p= V N C A where:  n = number of atoms  A = atomic weight  V C volume of unit cell  N = Avogadro’s number  A  Ceramic Crystal Structure  ­since composed of at least two elements, crystal structure is more complex  ­range from purely ionic to totally covalent  ­for materials in which atomic bonding is predominantly ionic, the crystal structures may  be thought of as being composed of electrically charged ions instead of atoms  ­cations: positively charged metallic ions (because cats are happy)  ­anions: negatively charged nonmetallic ions  ­two characteristics of ions influence crystal structure ­> magnitude of electrical charge on each of the ions  ­> relative sizes of cations and anions  ­crystal must be electrically neutral (ie. cation positive charges must be balanced by an  equal number of anion negative charges)  ­cations prefer to have as many nearest neighbor anions as possible  ­therefore, coordination number is related to the cation­anion radius ratio  ­for a specific coordination number, there is a critical (minimum) C Ar  ratio  Note: relationships between CN and cation anion ratios are based on geometrical  considerations and are approximations. Therefore there are some exceptions  AX­Type Crystal Structure  ­some common ceramic materials have equal numbers of cations and anions  ­these are referred to as AX compounds, where A denotes the cation and X the anion  ­there are several different crystal structures for AX compounds, each named after a  common material that assumes the particular structure  Rock Salt Structure (Sodium Chloride NaCl)  ­CN: 6  ­one cation situated at cube center and ine at the center of each of the 12 cube edges  ­two interpenetrating FCC lattices, one composed of cations, other of anions  ­example: NaCl, MgO, MnS, LiF and FeO ­FCC Cesium Chloride Structure  ­coordination number is 8 for both ion types  ­anions are located at each of the corners of the cube, cube center is a single cation  ­this is not a BCC because ions of two different kinds are involved  ­simple cubic  Zinc Blende Structure  ­CN: 4  ­zinc blende: ZnS  ­all corner and face positions of cubic cell are occupied by sulfur atoms while zinc atoms  fill interior tetrahedral positions  ­equivalent structure results if atom positions are reversed  ­each Zn atom is bonded to four S atoms and vice versa  ­FCC Fluorite (CaF ) 2 ­AX t2 e  ­ionic radii ratio is about 0.8, therefore CN is 8  ­calcium ions are positioned at the centers of cubes with fluorine ions at corners  ­crystal structure is similar to CsCl except only half of the center cube positions are  occupied by Ca ions  ­one unit cell consists of eight cubes  ­other examples: ZrO , UO , PuO  and ThO 2 2 2 2  ­simple cubic  Perovskite (BaTiO 3  ­Ba ions are situated at all eight corners  ­single Ti is at the cube center  ­Oxygen ions located at the center of each of the six faces  ­FCC  Density Computations for Ceramics  A A ∑ AC+ ∑ ¿ ¿ n ¿ p=¿ where: n’ – number of formula units  ∑ AC  – sum of atomic weights of all cations in formula unit  Silicate Ceramics  ­materials composed primarily of silicon and oxygen  ­rather than characterizing the crystal structures of these materials in terms of unit cells, it  4­ is more convenient to use various arrangements of an 4 O  tetrahedron  ­each atom of silicon is bonded to four oxygen atoms, which are situated at the corners of  the tetrahedron with silicon atom positioned at the center  ­not considered ionic because there is a significant covalent character which is directional  and relatively strong  ­various silicate structures arise from the different ways in which the tetrahedron units  can be combined into one, two or three­dimensional arrangements  Silica  ­most simple silicate material  ­structurally, it is a 3­D network generated when the corner oxygen atoms in each  tetrahedron are shared by adjacent tetrahedra  ­thus the material is electrically neutral and all atoms have stable electronic strucures  ­ratio of Si to O atoms is 1:2  ­three primary polymorphic crystalline forms: quartz, cristobalite and trydymite  ­atoms are not closely packed together, relatively low densities  ­high melting temperature of Si­O bond  Silicates  ­one two or three of the corner oxygen atoms are shared by other tetrahedral   Simple Silicates  ­most structurally simple ones involve isolated tetrahedra  ­Si2O7 ion is formed when two tetrahedral share a common oxygen atom  Layered Silicates  ­two dimensional sheet or layered structure can be produced by sharing of three oxygen  ions in each of the tetrahedral  2­ ­repeating unit formula may be represented by (Si O 2 5 ­net charge comes from unbonded oxygen atoms projecting out of plane  ­electroneutrality is ordinarily established by a second planar sheet structure having an  excess of cations  ­found in clay and other minerals  Carbon  ­exists in various polymorphic forms as well as amorphous state  ­does not fall in any of the metal, polymer or ceramic classifications  ­graphite is sometimes classified as ceramic though  Diamond  ­metastable carbon polymorph at room temperature and atmospheric pressure  ­crystal structure is a variant of the zinc blende, in which carbon atoms occupy all  positions (both Zn and S)  ­bonds are totally covalent, called the diamond cubic crystal structure  Graphite  ­crystal structure is more stable than diamond at ambient temperature and pressure  ­composed of layers of hexagonally arranged carbon atoms, within the layers each carbon  atom is bonded to three coplanar neighbor atoms by strong covalent bonds  ­fourth bonding electron participates in a weak van der Waals type of bond  Fullerenes  ­polymorphic form of carbon  ­exists in discrete molecular form and consists of a hollow spherical cluster of sixty  carbon atoms, single molecule is denoted by C 60 ­each molecule is composed of groups of carbon atoms that are bonded to each other to  form both hexagon and pentagon geometrical configurations  ­pure crystalline solid, packed together in a face centered cubic array  ­electrically insulating but can be made highly conductive  Polymorphism and Allotropy  ­some metals may have more than one crystal structure, phenomenon called  polymorphism  ­when found in elemental solids, condition is called allotropy  ­prevailing crystal structure depends on both temperature and external pressure  ­one example is found in carbon: graphite is stable polymorph at ambient conditions,  whereas diamond is formed at extremely high pressures  ­most often, physical properties are modified by a polymorphic transformation  Crystal Systems  ­lattice parameters: edge lengths (a,b,c) and three interaxial angles(alpha, beta and  gamma)  ­seven different possible combinations of a, b and c and alpha, beta and gamma each of  which represents a distinct crystal system  ­seven crystal systems are cubic, tetragonal, hexagonal, orthorhombic, rhombohedral  (trigonal), monoclinic and triclinic  ­both FCC and BCC structures belong to cubic crystal system  ­HCP is hexagonal  Hexagonal Indices  [u’ v’ w’] ­> [u v t w] 1 ' ' u= (2u−v ) 3 v= (2v −u ) ' 3 t=−(u+v) w=w' Crystallographic planes  ­if the plane passes through the selected origin than either a parallel plane must be  constructed or a new origin must be established in the corner of another unit cell  ­crystallographic plane either intersects or parallels each of the three axes  ­reciprocals of intersects are taken  ­number a chanted to a set of integers using a common factor  ­indices are enclosed by parantheses  ­for cubic crystals: planes and directions having the same indices are perpendicular to one  another  ­family of planes: contains all planes that are crystallographically equivalent (same  atomic packing)  ­family is indicated by indices enclosed in braces i.e. {1 0 0}  ­for cubic systems: all planes having the same indices, irrespective of order and sign  belong to the same family (example both (1 2 3) and (3 1 2) are part of the (1 2 3) family  Hexagonal Crystals  ­equivalent planes have same indices  ­four index (hkil) scheme  ­I is determined by the sum of h and k through I = ­(h+k) ­h, k and l indices are identical for both indexing systems  Ceramics  ­interstital sites exist in two different types  ­tetrahedral position: four atoms surround one type  ­octahedral position: six ion spheres  ­for each anion sphere, one octahedral and two tetrahedral positions will exist  ­Ceramic crystal structures depend on two factors: stacking of close packed anion layers  and manner in which interstitial sites are filled with cations    Single Crystal  ­periodic and repeated arrangement of atom
More Less

Related notes for MSE101H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit