Textbook Notes (368,107)
Canada (161,650)
Psychology (2,971)
PSY100H1 (1,821)
all (37)
Chapter 3

Ch3.docx

11 Pages
84 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY100H1
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Winter

Description
Ch. 3 2014­02­01 Synaesthesia: cross­sensory  experience Idiosyncratic: Characteristic This chapter is about psychological activities at the genetic and neurochemical levels, and the functions of  various brain regions; on drugs and certain genetics Genetic Basis of  Psychological Science ­ Genetic factors and environmental factors shape up who we are ­ “Genetics” refers to the process involved in turning genes on and off; it reveals how environmental  factors affect our genes, thoughts, behaviours and feelings  ­ Genome: an organism’s compete set of DNA, including its genes. It provides detailed instructions for  everything; everything is determined by which genes are turned on or off within the cell.  ­ Genome provides the option, and the environment determines which option is taken  ­ Chromosomes: structures made of genes; Human has 23 pairs of them with half of each pair coming  from each parent ­ Genes are components of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) ­ DNA: substance that consists of two intertwined stands of molecules. The sequence of molecules  specifies an instruction to manufacture a distinct protein. ­ Protein: the basic chemicals that make up the structure of cells and direct their activities ­ Gene: a segment of DNA, is involved in producing a protein that carries out a specific task; the  environment then determines which  protein are produced and when are they produced ­ Gene expression causes cells become specialized; it determines the body’s basic physical makeup and  also specific developments Pg. 84­95,  What Are the Basic Brain Structures and their functions? 108 ­  ­ The nervous system is divided into two units: ­ Central Nervous System (CNS) ­ Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) ­ CNS consists of the spinal cord and brain ­ PNS consists of all the other nerve cells in the body  ­ PNS transmits a variety of information to the CNS, which organizes and evaluates that information and  directs PNS to perform specific actions or make adjustments ­ Early in life, overabundant connections form among the brain’s neurons, then life experiences help dry  out some of these connections to strengthen what is left. The Brain: Understanding its functions ­ Case: Phineas Gage The accident has caused major personality changes; his intellectual faculties and animal propensities  have been destroyed. After a decade, his health has declined and he died within a few months. ­ Conclusion: Gage’s psychological impairments had been severe and that some areas of the brain  have specific functions that could not been taken over by the other parts ­ Prefrontal cortex: the part that is responsible for personality and self­control; it is concerned with social  phenomena ­ The ancient Egyptians believe the heart determines the afterlife; the Greeks and Romans then  recognized the brain for normal mental functioning ­ Phrenology: the practice of assessing personality traits and mental abilities by measuring bumps on  human skull (Franz Gall) ­ Karl Lashley: specific brain regions are involved in motor control and sensory experiences; but all other  parts contributed equally to mental abilities.  ­ Broca’s area: left frontal region; it is important of speech and crucial for the production of languages The Brain:  ­ Hindbrain: Spinal cord: a rope of neural tissue that runs inside the hollows of the vertebrate from above  the pelvis to the base of the skull. ­ coordinates each reflex;  ­ carries signals from the brain to the body parts below ­ the cord is composed of two distinct tissue: the grey matter: dominated by neurons’ cell bodies, and  the white matter, which consists of mostly of axons (nerve fibre) and the fatty sheaths that surround  them  ­ Brainstem: the base of the skull; ­ consists: Medulla Oblongata, the pons, and the midbrain ­ it houses the nerves that control the most basic functions of survival ­ many reflexes emerges from here ­ consists of network of neurons­ reticular formation which project up into the cerebral cortex (outer  portion of the brain) and affect general alertness. / sleep ­ Cerebellum: large protuberance connected to the back of the brain stem ­ important for motor function (muscle activities)  ­ damage of the bottom causes head tilt, balance problems, and a loss of smooth compensation of eye  position for head movements ­ damage to the ridge would affect your walking ­ damage to the bulging lobes would cause a loss of limb coordination ­ important for motor learning; maybe empathy  ­ Forebrain: above the brain stem; consists of two cerebral hemispheres; left and right; The outside is the  cerebral cortex; below are the subcortical regions, some of them belong to the limbic system, the  border that separates the evolutionary older and newer parts they include:  ­ Hypothalamus: the brain’s master regulatory structure that is vital for temperature regulation. Emotion,  sexual behaviour, and motivation. It receives inputs from everywhere and projects influence back to  everywhere. E.g. body temperature, blood pressure, glucose levels, thirst, hunger and basic drives. ­ Thalamus: the gateway to the cortex; it receives most incoming sensory information before it reaches  the cortex except the sense of smell. It shuts the gate on incoming sensation while the brain rests ­ Hippocampus: a brain structure important for the formation of new memory; it creates  interconnections within the cerebral cortex with each new experience; might be responsible for how we  remember arrangements of both places and space ­ Amygdala: a brain structure that serves a vital role in our learning to associate things with emotional  responses and in processing emotional information; connect memories of things to the emotions  engendered by those things. It is in front of the hippocampus. It has a special role in our responding to  stimuli elicit fear and evaluating a facial expression. ­ The Basal Ganglia: a system of subcortical structures that are important for the initiation of planned  movement. Damage of it can impair the learning of movements and of habits. One structure called the  nucleus accumbens is important for experiencing pleasures and rewards; it activates dopamine  neurons. ­ The Cerebral Cortex: Complex Mental Activity ­ The outer layer of brain tissue, which forms the convoluted and twisted surface of the brain.  ­ The site of all thoughts, detailed perceptions, and consciousness; the source of culture and  communication ­ It has four lobes: frontal, parietal, temporal and Occipital (lobe) ­ Corpus Callosum: the massive bridge of millions of axon, connect the hemisphere and allows  information to flow between them  ­ Occipital Lobes: regions of the cerebral cortex, at the back of the brain; important for vision; visual  images of colours, forms and motions.  ­ Parietal Lobes: regions of the cerebral cortex, in front/on top of the occipital lobes and behind the  frontal lobes, important of the sense of touch and the spatial layout of an environment; with opposite  direction of the transmission of information. The information is represented along the primary  somatosensory cortex:  ­ Temporal lobes: the lower region of the cerebral cortex, important for processing auditory information  and for memory. It is where the fusiform face area is which becomes active when people look at faces.  ­ Frontal lobes: the region at the front of the cerebral cortex concerned with planning and movement. It  consists of premotor cortex (neurons that project to the spinal cord to move the body’s muscles) and  the primary motor cortex. The rest consists of the prefrontal cortex: a region of the frontal lobes,  prominent in humans, important for attention working memory, decision making appropriate social  behaviour and personality, which occupies 30% percent of the brain.  ­ Lobotomy: damaging the prefrontal cortex to treat mental patients, it leaves patients emotionally flat  and easier to manage. But this also leaves them disconnected from their social surroundings. How are Neural Messages Integrated into Communication Systems? PNS: transmit a variety of information to the CNS and responds to messages from the CNS to perform  specific behaviours or make body adjustments  The PNS: consists of the Somatic System & the Autonomic System ­ Somatic nervous system: a major component of the peripheral nervous system that transmits sensory  signals to the CNS via nerves and back to the muscles, joints and skin to initiate, modulate and inhibit  movements; specialized receptors.  ­ Autonomic nervous system: regulates the body’s internal en
More Less

Related notes for PSY100H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit