Textbook Notes (367,969)
Canada (161,538)
Psychology (2,971)
PSY100H1 (1,821)
Chapter 11

Psych notes-Chapter 11.docx

6 Pages
113 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY100H1
Professor
Ashley W.Denton
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 11 Developmental Psychology: The study of changes in physiology, cognition, and social  behavior over the lifespan. Our genes set the pace and order of development. Environment influences as well.  Developing human known as embryo. After two months, the growing human called a fetus  Basic brain areas begin to form by week 4, cells forming the cortex visible by week 7,  thalamus and hypothalamus by week 10, left and right hemispheres by week 12. Hormones that circulate in the womb influence the developing fetus. Mother’s emotional  states also affect the development of the fetus.  Teratogens: agents that can impair physical and cognitive development in the womb,  include drugs, alcohol, bacteria, viruses, and chemicals.  Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS): The symptoms of which consist of low birth weight, face  and head abnormalities, slight mental retardation, and behavioural and cognitive  problems.  An infant’s sense of hearing and sense of smell relatively acute, but vision only 20­30  centimeters Grasping reflex: believed to be a survival mechanism that has persisted from our primate  ancestors Rooting reflex: turning and sucking that infants automatically engage in when a nipple  present . Early brain growth has two important aspects: specific areas within the brain mature and  become functional Brain learn to communicate with one another through synaptic connections.  Brain circuits mature is through myelination­>neurons in the visual cortex develop more  and more myelination as infant’s brain ages  Synaptic pruning: Process where by the synaptic connections in brain are frequently used  are preserved and those that are not are lost.  Critical periods: biologically determined time periods for the development of specific  skills If skills not acquired during critical periods, then unable to acquire skills. Sensitive periods: Biologically determined time periods when specific skills develop  most easily. Ex: language  Starting from infants, people have highly interactive social relationships  Attachment: Strong emotional connection that persists over  time and across  circumstances  Increase to heightened feelings of safety and security, also motivates in fants and  caregivers to stay in close contact.  Infants who exhibit attachment behaviours have a higher chance of survival through adult  protection  Babies attend to high­pitched voices Other animals show signs of attachment as well  Imprinting: follow the first adult they see  Separation anxiety: which the infants become distressed when they cannot see or are  separated from their attachment figures  The strange­situation Test: Three outcomes:  1. Secure: Attachment style for a majority of infants, readily  comforted when caregiver returns after brief separation (65%) 2. Avoidant: Attachment style in which infants ignore caregiver when  he or she returns after a brief separation (20­25%) 3. Anxious­ambivalent: Attachment style in which infants become  extremely upset when their caregiver leaves but rejects the  caregiver when he/she returns (10­15%) Disorganized attachment: attachment style in which infants give mixed responses  wen their caregiver leaves and then returns from short absence.  Caregivers’ personality contributes to the child’s attachment style  Oxytocin: related to social behaviours, including infant/caregiver attachment, maternal  tendencies, feelings of social acceptance and bonding, and sexual gratification. Preferential­looking technique: Researchers show infant two things. If infant looks longer  at one thing, researcher know which one infant finds more interesting  Orienting reflex: Humans’ tendency to pay more attention to new stimuli than to stimuli  to which they have become habituated, or grown accustomed.  Visual aquity: how well an infant can see.  Infants respond more to objects with high­contrast patterns Stereograms: one view of an image is shown to one eye and another view to the other,  this information is then converted in to depth perception.  Disparity information: (The differences in images seen by their eyes) to perceive depth.  Event­related potentials (EEG): pick up neural activity from the scalp Older infants remembered longer  Infantile Amnesia: the inability to remember events from early childhood. Children begin to retain memories after developing the ability to create  autobiographical memory based on person experience. Memory develops with language acquisition because the ability to use words and  concepts aids in memory retention. Source amnesia: difficulty knowing where they learned something  Children go through four stages of development: (Piaget) 1. Sensorimotor: first stage in which infants acquire information about the  world through their senses and respond reflexively; acquire information  only through their senses 2. Preoperational: children can think about objects not in their immediate  view and have developed various conceptual models of how the world  works. 3. Concrete operational: remain in this stage until adolescence; children  begin to think about and understand operations in ways that are reversible 4. Formal operational: involves the ability to think abstractly and to  formulate and test hypothes
More Less

Related notes for PSY100H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit