Textbook Notes (368,432)
Canada (161,877)
Psychology (2,971)
PSY100H1 (1,821)
Chapter 2

Chapter 2.doc

4 Pages
92 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY100H1
Professor
Ashley Waggoner Denton
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 2: Research Methodology Scientific Inquiry - Empirical questions: can be answered by observing and measuring the world around us, can be proven T/F - Many significant findings are result of serendipity: the unexpected stumbling upon something important - Chance findings typically occur when some event happens was NOT part of original plan of study o An objective examination of the natural world has FOUR goals  what happens (description)  when it happens (prediction)  what causes it to happen (causal control)  why it happens (explanation) Empirical Process 1. Theory: idea or model of how something works 2. Hypothesis:  specific prediction of what should be observed if the theory is correct 3. Research: involves systemic and careful collection of data (objective info) to examine or test  Jean Piaget - Infant­child  development - Theory: cognitive development occurs in a fixed series of stages from birth to adolescence - One test: children of different ages compare volume of equal amounts of liquid in different­sized glasses - Found: responses consistent within an age group! Only children at certain age/stage able to see all equal - Studies in psycho science have SUBSEQUENTLY shown some aspects of this theory were wrong.  Types of studies in psychological research Choose design: 1) experimental 2) correlational 3) descriptive - Differ in extent of control over variables, therefore over in extent to which the research can make conclusions  about causation Variables: something you either measure or manipulate Operational definitions: quantification of a variable that allows it to be measured Experiment: study wherein variables are both measured and manipulated Conditions of an experiment - Independent variable: what is manipulated - Dependent variable: what is measured - CONDITIONS: refers to the different levels of the independent variable  ­ BENEFIT of experiments: can study causal relationship between TWO variables ­ If independent variable proves to influence dependent variable, assume to be cause of change in dependent variable ­ Crucial issue: whether it is desirable to show a causal relationship between two variables  ­ Confound: anything that affects a dependent variable that may unintentionally vary between the different experimental  conditions of a study Controlling confounds ­ To minimize possibility of anything other than the independent variable having affect, rule of alternative explanations  ­ change nothing but the independent variable Selection Bias   ­ Occurs when participates differ between conditions in unexpected ways ­ ONLY WAY to ensure equivalency in groups: random assignment: each participant has an equal chance of being assigned  to any level of the independent variable.  o differences average out, thus helps balance out BOTH known and unknown factors Correlational study ­ Examines how variables are naturally related in the real world without any attempt by the researcher to alter them.  ­ CANNOT show causation Third variable Problem #1 ­ Occurs when you cannot directly manipulate the independent variable and therefore cannot be confident that it was the actual  causes of differences in the dependent variable ­ Occurs in all correlational studies  o Always possible some extraneous factor is responsible for apparent relation between your variables ­ Some are obvious, some may not even be identifiable ­ The simple possibility of a third­variable explanation rules out concluding a causal relationship Problem #2 ­ Not knowing the direction of the cause­effect relation between variables o Both scenarios seem equally possible (ambiguity): directionality problem Correlational studies widely used in psycho because show how variables are naturally related ­ MOST research is psychopathology uses correlational studies. Use statistics to try to rule out potential third variable and be  more confident.  Descriptive studies  ­ Sometimes called observational studies because of how data is collected ­ Involves observing and noting behaviour in order to provide a systematic and objective analysis TWO TYPES: 1) Naturalistic observation: observer is passive and apart from the situation, making no attempt to alter it 2) Participant observation: researcher is actively involved in the situation, i.e. joins a cult o Problem: observers may lose objectivity and participants may change their behaviour if they know they are being  observed Especially valuable in early stages of research, when researchers are simply trying to see whether a phenomenon exists  ­ Darwin:  observed beak types in Galapagos Islands, credited adaption, later resulting in his theory of evolution   Major Methods Observation techniques Need to make 3 decisions: 1) Conducted in lab/natural environment? 2) How data is to be collected? 3) Observer be visible? Reactivity: observation might alter behaviour of those being observed (people what to make positive impression) Hawthorne effect: changes in behaviour that occur when people know that others are observing them Observer bias: the systematic errors in observation that occur due to an observer’s expectations (careful with culture norms)  Experimenter expectancy effect: observer bias leads to actual changes in behaviour of those being observed o Rosenthal study, college students trained rats to run maze, half were told their rats were genetically good, other half  not told. Those who were told had rats who learned the task more quickly, students expectations altered how treated  their rats, in turn influenced speed at which rats learned.  o To prevent this: best if person running the study is blind to (unaware of) the hypothesis of study.  o Also to have multiple observers to protect against idiosyncratic coding  Problem: the significant challenge with multiple observers is to minimize variability in how each observer  catalogs or interprets the behaviors encountered during observation Asking Approach  Methods: surveys, interviews, questionnaires, and self­reports.  Critical issue: how to frame question  ­ Open­ended question: allow respondents to answer in as much detail as they feel is appropriate  ­ Closed­ended question: require respondents to select among a fixed number of options, like multiple­choice How to select people? Want to generalize.  ­ Group of interest is population, subset of people who are studied is sample  ­ Because it is desirable that the sample be representative of the population, researchers often use random sampling, each  member of the population has equal chance of being chosen.  Self­report methods ­ Such as questionnaires  ­ Gather data from large number of people in a short period of time ­ Easy to administer, relatively cheap and cost­efficient ­ Self­report bias ­ Problems: self­introduced bias, hesitant to reveal negative info about themselves, less than accurate self­perceptions o Socially desirable responding (faking good): when people respond in a way that is most socially acceptable or  makes them look good. Interviews ­ Used for groups that cannot be studied via surveys ­ Gives opportunity to explore new lines of questioning, if answers given to initial questions  inspire inquiry not originally  planned Cross­cultural questionnaires ­ How question is worded is important ­ Researcher must be sensitive to language differences and cultural norms  Quantifying Responses ­ Two different ways to quantity people’s responses by offering a fixed number of options o Likert scale: ranking agreement with a statement (rank 1 to 5 from strongly agree to strongly disagree) o Semantic differential scale: ranking feelings about a statement based on a bipolar scale (Good vs. Bad) Case Studies ­ The intensive examination an individual, typically one who is unusual ­ Most commonly conducted on those who have a brain injury or psychology disorder Problems with case studies ­ Difficult to know whether the researcher’s hypothesis about the cause of the psychological disorder is correct ­ Has no control over person’s life and is forced to make assumptions about th
More Less

Related notes for PSY100H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit