Textbook Notes (368,611)
Canada (162,009)
Psychology (2,981)
PSY333H1 (15)
Chapter

Textbook notes for Test 1

17 Pages
156 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY333H1
Professor
William Huggon
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter  1 Health psychology: understanding psychological influences on how people stay healthy, why they become ill,  and how they respond when they do get ill. Health psychologists: Study these issues + promote interventions to help people stay well or get over illness. eg: information about why people smoke helps a health psych researcher understand the habit and design  interventions to help people stop smoking. 1948 WHO’s definition of health: complete state of physical, mental and social well­being; not merely the  absence of disease or infirmity. = balance among physical, mental and social well being = “wellness” Health psychologists: 1. Focus on health promotion and maintenance: ­ how to get kids to develop good health habits ­ how to promote regular exercise ­ how to design a media campaign to get people to improve their diets 2. Study the psychological aspects of prevention and treatment of illness. 3. Focus on the etiology and correlates of health, illness and dysfunction ­ etiology: origins or causes of illness ­behavioral and social factors that contribute to health/illness and dysfunction 4. Attempt to analyze + attempt to improve the health care system and the formulation of health policy. ­ study the impact of health institutions and health professionals on people’s behavior and develop recommendations for improving health care. => Health psychology:  ­ educational, scientific, professional contributions of psychology to the promotion and maintenance of health ­ identification of the causes and correlates of health, illness, and related dysfunction ­ improvement of the health care system ­ health policy formation Mind­body relationship Earliest times:  ­ mind + body considered a single unit. ­ disease = evil spirits entering the body ­ treatment = exorcism   *trephination: drill holes in skull Greeks: ­ earliest to identify role of bodily functioning in health and illness. ­ developed humoral theory of illness (Hippocrates, Galen) ­ disease = when 4 circulating fluids of the body are out of balance: blood black bile yellow bile phlegm ­ treatment: restore balance among the humors. ­ specific personality types believed to be associated with the bodily temparaments in which 1 of the 4 humors  predominated. ­ ascribed disease states to bodily factors + believed these factors can also have an impact on the mind. Middle Ages: ­ supernatural explanations of illness ­ disease: god’s punishment for evildoing ­ treatment:      driving out evil by torturing the body     prayer     penance     bloodletting ­ church was the guardian of medical knowledge ­ medical practice = religious overtones, healing and practice of religion were indistinguishable Renaissance to present day: ­ rejection of humoral theory of illness ­ scientific understanding of cellular pathology (Kaplan) ­ Descartes’ doctrine of mind­body dualism ­ medicine looked more to medical laboratory and bodily factors as a basis for medical progress. ­ physical evidence became the sole basis for diagnosis and treatment of illness. Psychoanalytic contributions Modern psychology: Freud’s work on conversion hysteria  ­ specific unconscious conflicts can produce particular physical disturbances that symbolize the repressed  psychological conflicts. ­ patient converts the conflict into a symptom via the voluntary nervous system; he/she then becomes relatively  free of the anxiety the conflict would otherwise produce Psychosomatic medicine ­ researchers linked patterns of personality to specific illnesses. ­ Dunbar, Alexander: conflicts produce anxiety, which takes a physical toll on the body via the automatic  nervous system, which eventually produces an actual organic disturbance. ­ now: onset of disease requires interaction of a variety of factors: possible genetic weakness in the organism presence of environmental stressors early learning experiences and conflicts individual cognitions and coping efforts Behavioral medicine ­ focus on objective and clinically relevant interventions that would demonstrate the connections between body  and mind ­ interdisciplinary field concerned with integrating behavioral science and biomedical science for understanding  physical health and illness , and for developing and applying knowledge and techniques to prevent, diagnose,  treat, and rehabilitate. Current views of the mind­body relationship ­ now known that physical health is inextricably interwoven with the psychological and social environment ­ all conditions of health and illness are influenced by psychological and social factors ­ treatment of illness and prognosis for recovery are affected by factors like relationship between patient and practitioner expectations about pain and discomfort ­ staying well is determined by good health habits; for the most part under one’s personal control, and factors  like culture socio­economic status place stress availability of health resources social support Biopsychosocial model of health ­ fundamental assumption: health and illness are consequences of the interplay of biological, psychological, and  social factors. Biopsychosocial vs. biomedical model ­Biomedical model: illness can be explained on the basis of aberrant somatic processes, eg: biochemical  imbalances or neurophysiological abnormalities. assumes: psychological and social processes are largely independent of the disease process *liabilities of biomedical model: ­ reductionistic: reduces illness to low­level processes ­ essentially a single­factor model of illness: explains illness in terms of a biological malfunction ­ implicitly assumes a mind­body dualism: mind and body are separate entities ­ clearly emphasizes illness over health ­ difficulty accounting for why a particular set of somatic conditions need not inevitably lead to illness Advantages of the biopsychosocial model ­ maintains that biological, psychological, and social factors are all­important determinants of health and illness:  both macrolevel processes and microlevel processes interact to produce a state of health or illness ­ multiple causal factors considered ­ mind and body inseparable ­ emphasizes both health and illness Systems theory: maintains that all levels of organization in any entity are linked to each other hierarchically and  that change in any one level will affect change in all the other levels.  = microlevel processes are nested within the macrolevel processes and that changes on the microlevel can have  macrolevel effects and vice versa. Clinical implications of the biopsychosocial model ­ process of diagnosis should always consider the interacting role of biological, psychological, and social factors  in assessing an individual’s health or illness: interdisciplinary approach ­ recommendations for treatment must also examine all 3 sets of factors: team approach ­ significance of the relationship between patient and practitioner Factors that led to the development of health psychology Changing Patterns of Illness ­ until the 20  century, acute disorders (tuberculosis, pneumonia) were major causes of illness and death acute disorders: short­term medical illness; often result of viral/bacterial invader, usually amenable to cure ­ now: chronic illnesses (esp. heart disease, cancer) are main causes of disability and death. chronic illnesses: slowly developing diseases; often can’t be cured but can be managed ­ chronic illnesses are diseases in which psychological and social factors are implicated as causes.  ­ because people may live with chronic diseases for many years, psychological issues arise in connection with  them. Advances in technology and research ­ health psychologists conduct research that identifies risk factors for disease and help people learn to change  their diet and stick to their resolution. ­ certain treatments that may prolong life severely compromise quality of life ­ patients are asked their preferences regarding life­sustaining measures and they may require counselling. Role of epidemiology ­ study of the frequency, distribution, and causes of infectious and noninfectious disease in a population, based  on an investigation of the physical and social environment ­ morbidity: number of cases of a disease that exist at some given point in time. incidence: number of new cases prevalence: total number of existing cases ­ mortality: number of deaths due to particular causes ­ health psych is concerned with biological outcomes and also with health­related quality of life and  symptomatic complaints Changing perspectives on health and health care ­ Lalonde Report: framework of health that rested on 4 main cornerstones human biology environment lifestyle health care organization ­ Epp Report: need to view health in non­medical terms + give greater consideration to the social factors that  contour health. ­ public health­ health promotion perspective: health is a capacity/resource linked to the ability to achieve one’s  goals, to learn, and to grow. ­ health: capacity of people to adapt to, respond to, or control life’s challenges and changes. * health psych’s main emphasis on prevention has the potential to reduce the number of $$ devoted to the  management of illness * health psychologists have done substantial research on what makes people satisfied/not with their health care * health care industry employs 100s of individuals, its impact is huge. Increased Medical Acceptance ­ value of health psychologists is increasingly recognized Demonstrated Contributions to Health ­ developed a variety of short­term behavioral interventions to address a wide variety of health­related problems managing pain modifying bad health habits managing side effects or treatment effects associated with a range of chronic diseases many have contributed to the actual decline in the incidence of some diseases, esp. coronary heart disease. Methodological contributions Experiments ­ 2 or more conditions that differ from each other in exact and predetermined ways ­ people are randomly assigned to experience these different conditions ­ their reactions measured ­ randomized clinical trials: experiments to evaluate treatments/interventions and their effectiveness over time Correlational studies ­ health psychologist measures whether a change in 1 variable corresponds with changes in another variable * impossible to determine the direction of causality unambiguously ­ more adaptable than experiments ­ can study variables that can’t be manipulated experimentally Prospective designs ­ looks forward in time to see how a group of individuals changes, or how a relationship between 2 variables  changes over time ­ longitudinal research: observe the same people over a long period of time Retrospective research ­ looks backward in time, attempts to reconstruct the conditions that led to a current situation Qualitative research ­ interviews ­ focus groups ­ case studies ­ open ended questions on surveys ­ include individual’s voice + perspective to gain a richer understanding of the experiences and factors related to  a particular health issue Purpose of health psychology training Careers in practice ­ go into medicine: physicians, nurses ­ clinical research setting ­ allied health professional fields:  social work occupational therapy dietetics physical therapy public health Careers in research ­ public health, psychology, medicine ­ public health researchers: broad goal of improving the health of the general population typically work in academic settings public agencies Health Canada family planning clinics Canadian Health Network and its constituent organizations and agencies hospitals clinics other health care agencies ­ inform policymakers about changes that would benefit communities ­ formally evaluate programs for improving health­related practices ­ chart the progress of particular diseases ­ monitor health threats in the workplace ­ develop interventions to reduce threats ­ conduct research on health issues Chapter  2 Function of the nervous system Nervous system: complex network of interconnected nerve fibres that functions to regulate many important  bodily functions, including the response to and recovery from stress. made up of: ­ central nervous system (CNS): brain + spinal cord ­ peripheral nervous system (PNS): rest of the nerves in the body, including those that connect to  the  brain and spinal cord PNS made up of: ­> somatic (voluntary) nervous system: connects nerve fibres to voluntary muscles and provides  the brain with feedback in the form of sensory info about voluntary movement ­> autonomic (involuntary) nervous system: connects the CNS with all internal organs over  which people do not customarily have control Regulation of the autonomic nervous system occurs via: ­ sympathetic nervous system: prepares the body to respond to emergencies, to strong emotions  (anger/fear), and to strenuous activity. Its concerned with the mobilization and exertion of energy, called a  catabolic system ­ parasympathetic nervous system: controls the activities of organs under normal circumstances and acts  antagonistically to the sympathetic nervous system. Restores the body to normal state after an emergency.  Activation common during processes like digestion, can be experiences as a feeling of relaxation/drowsiness  after a large meal. Its concerned with conservation of body energy, called an anabolic system Brain ­ command centre of the body ­ receives: afferent (sensory) impulses from the peripheral nerve endings ­ sends: efferent (motor) impulses to the extremities and to internal organs to carry out necessary movement 3 sections: ­ hindbrain ­ midbrain ­forebrain Hindbrain: 3 main parts ­ medulla: located just above the point where the spinal cord enters the skull heavily responsible for regulation of heart rate, respiration, blood pressure receives info about the rate at which the heart is contracting, and speeds up/slows down the heart rate as  needed. receives sensory info about blood pressure and the levels of CO2 and O2 in the body to regulate blood  vessel constriction and the rate of breathing ­ pons: link between the hindbrain and the midbrain helps control respiration ­ cerebellum: coordinates voluntary muscle movement maintenance of balance and equilibrium maintenance of muscle tone and posture Midbrain: major pathway for sensory and motor impulses moving between the forebrain and the hindbrain responsible for the coordination of visual and auditory reflexes Forebrain: 2 main sections *diencephalon:  ­ thalamus: involved in the recognition of sensory stimuli relay of sensory impulses to the cerebral cortex ­ hypothalamus: regulates the centres in the medulla that control cardiac functioning, blood pressure,  respiration. responsible for regulating water balance in the body regulating appetites, including hunger and sexual desire important transition centre between the thoughts generated in the cerebral cortex of the brain and their  impact on internal organs eg: embarassment  ▯blushing via the hypothalamus  ▯vasomotor centre in the medulla  ▯blood vessels            anxiety: secretion of HCl in the stomach via signals from the hypothalamus            together with the pituitary gland, hypothalamus helps regulate the endocrine system which releases  hormones, influencing functioning in target organs throughout the body *telencephalon: composed of the 2 hemispheres (left, right) of the cerebral cortex ­ cerebral cortex: largest portion of the brain           involved in higher order intelligence, memory, personality          sensory impulses that come from the peripheral areas of the body, up the spinal cord, and through the  hindbrain and midbrain are received and interpreted here          motor impulses pass down from the cortex to lower portions of the brain and then to other parts of the  body          consists of 4 lobes: frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital                   each lobe has its own memory storage area or areas of association, through them the brain is able to  relate current situations to past ones Limbic system ­ border the midline of the brain ­ 
More Less

Related notes for PSY333H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit