SOC312H1 Chapter Notes - Chapter 12: World Population Conference, Unemployment Benefits, Reproductive Health

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Published on 17 Apr 2013
School
UTSG
Department
Sociology
Course
SOC312H1
Professor
SOC312: Chapter 12 Demographic Change and Policy Changes
Introduction
Most of the growth over this century will take place in the developing countries,
which will only worsen the dire socioeconomic conditions of these societies
The world’s pop will increasingly get older, but aging will be most intense in the
most advanced societies
Population Policy
Population policy: objective plan formulated by the government to reduce,
increase or stabilize population growth rates over some specified period of time
Aim of population policies is to effect quantitative change through 1+
demographic variables (fertility, mortality, migration) to reduce/increase rate of
pop growth
Direct population policies: Policies with a direct bearing on fertility, mortality, or
migration
o Ex. Family planning programs aimed at affecting birth rates, through
effective contraceptives and education
Indirect policies: programs designed to influence non-demographic variables that
have an indirect impact on the key demographic variables
o Ex. Programs such as immunization programs, anti-malaria campaigns in
poor countries
There are projections that they make where there are high, medium, low, no
change scenarios for future forecasts of pop growth
o Ex. populations where fertility has been below replacement for many
years, the projections could forecast eventual deficits in the working age
population
Population Policy-Societal Interrelationships
The process of formulating and implementing population policy always takes
place within a broader societal context
Societal well-being is an important determinant of a country’s demographic
regime
Depending on how governments perceive demographic/socioeconomic
conditions o country, will devise policies according to four different aims:
1. To raise the rate of natural increase
2. To reduce the rate of natural increase
3. To maintain the current rate of natural increase
4. To achieve population growth through immigration
For a democratic society, because elected politicians typically hold office for only
a few years, they’re no long term planning. There’s also an emphasis on
individual freedom and welfare as paramount to broader societal objectivities
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Document Summary

Soc312: chapter 12 demographic change and policy changes. Most of the growth over this century will take place in the developing countries, which will only worsen the dire socioeconomic conditions of these societies. The world"s pop will increasingly get older, but aging will be most intense in the most advanced societies. Population policy: objective plan formulated by the government to reduce, increase or stabilize population growth rates over some specified period of time. Aim of population policies is to effect quantitative change through 1+ demographic variables (fertility, mortality, migration) to reduce/increase rate of pop growth. Direct population policies: policies with a direct bearing on fertility, mortality, or migration: ex. Family planning programs aimed at affecting birth rates, through effective contraceptives and education. Indirect policies: programs designed to influence non-demographic variables that have an indirect impact on the key demographic variables: ex. Programs such as immunization programs, anti-malaria campaigns in poor countries.

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