SOC203H1 Chapter Notes -Heredity

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27 Mar 2013
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SOC203
18 March 2013
Readings
Durkheim- Anomic Suicide
Every disturbance of equilibrium, even though it achieves greater comfort and a heightening of general
vitality, is an impulse to voluntary death.
- If industrial or financial crises increase suicides, it is because they are crises not because they
cause poverty.
No living being can be happy or even exist unless his needs are sufficiently proportioned to his means.
If his needs require more than can be granted, or even merely something of a different sort, they will be
under continual friction and can only function painfully.
Quantity of material supplies necessary to the physical maintenance of a human.
- Beyond the indispensable minimum which satisfies nature when instinctive, a more awakened
reflection suggests better conditions, seemingly desirable ends craving fulfillment. Such
appetites, however, admittedly sooner or later reach a limit which they cannot pass.
- Nothing appears in man’s organic nor in his psychological constitution which sets a limit to such
tendencies.
Our capacity for feeling is in itself an insatiable and bottomless abyss.
- If nothing external can restrain this capacity, it can only be a source of torment to itself.
Unlimited desires are insatiable by definition and insatiability is rightly considered a sign of
morbidity. Inextinguishable thirst is constantly renewed torture.
One does not advance when one walks toward no goal.
- To pursue a goal which is by definition unattainable is to condemn oneself to a state of
perpetual unhappiness.
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Document Summary

Every disturbance of equilibrium, even though it achieves greater comfort and a heightening of general vitality, is an impulse to voluntary death. If industrial or financial crises increase suicides, it is because they are crises not because they cause poverty. No living being can be happy or even exist unless his needs are sufficiently proportioned to his means. If his needs require more than can be granted, or even merely something of a different sort, they will be under continual friction and can only function painfully. Quantity of material supplies necessary to the physical maintenance of a human. Beyond the indispensable minimum which satisfies nature when instinctive, a more awakened reflection suggests better conditions, seemingly desirable ends craving fulfillment. Such appetites, however, admittedly sooner or later reach a limit which they cannot pass. Nothing appears in man"s organic nor in his psychological constitution which sets a limit to such tendencies.

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