Textbook Notes (368,826)
Canada (162,194)
Sociology (1,513)
SOC205H1 (16)
Chapter

Week 8 Readings.docx

5 Pages
132 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC205H1
Professor
Brent Berry
Semester
Spring

Description
SOC205 Week 8 CH 7. Immigration and Race in the City – Fong, Eric History of Immigration • 1900­1940: immigrants mostly from British Isles and north­western European countries ▯ settle mostly on  the Prairies or the West • 1940­1950s: over 1.2 million immigrants arriving (Italy, Greece)  • 1960­present: over 2.2 million immigrants entering (mostly non­European countries; i.e. Middle East,  Africa, Asia, Pacific regions)  • Immigrants from Asia and Pacific region dominate 2000­2006, and then Africa, Middle East Where Immigrants Settle • Most immigrants at the beginning of the last century didn’t settle in cities but due to urbanization,  immigrant settlement patterns reflected the general population distribution at the time  ▯shift towards cities • Majority of immigrants chosen to settle in large cities • Why?  ▯Availability of jobs, possibility of ethnic networks  • Five largest Canadian cities with a large proportion of immigrants: o Toronto (46%) o Vancouver (40%)  o Montreal o Ottawa­Gatineau o Calgary • Not all cities have high proportions of immigrants o Ex. Cities in eastern Canada and in Saskatchewan have a smaller share of immigrants   Cities in Maritimes, Quebec  o Implications: some cities face issues related to immigrant adaptation more than others do  Racial and Ethnic Composition in Cities • Canadians can name up to 4 ethnic backgrounds in the Census • Identification with multiple ethnic backgrounds is more common in cities due to intermarriages • Also reported total number of those who gave only one ethnic background and those who reported more  than one  ▯reflects how Canadians view their ethnic identities • Among those identifying with multiple ethnicities, English, French, Scottish, Irish are always among the  largest six groups in the largest six cities.  • Individuals reporting only single ethnic backgrounds are most likely immigrants or children o immigrations   ▯individuals tend to be concentrated in largest cities  • Individuals reporting partial ethnicity (reporting multiple ethnic backgrounds) are more likely descendants  of the early immigrant groups (ex. British, Northern, Western Europeans) ▯ individuals are widely  dispersed  across Canadian cities  Socioeconomic Background of Immigrants • Immigrants have higher levels of education than the Canadian born population  o 21% of immigrants over 15 years old have completed university vs. 14% of Canadian born residents • But do WORSE in the labour market; indicated by these factors: o Lower employment rate o Higher % who are not in the labour force o Higher % working in part time than full time jobs SOC205 Week 8 o Lower average income  • Knowing at least one of the two official languages is important for most immigrants to Canada to become  economically and socially integrated o Allows them to compete in the labour market  o To develop new social relations and to extend social networks Economic Attainments of Immigrants  • Economic integration: refers to economic performance of immigrants as compared to native­born  residents • Economic opportunities not only affect their integration process, but also have possible economic  consequences for the city economy (ex. increasing supply of labour and affecting the quality of the labour  force)  • Dominant perspective was the assimilation perspective  ▯largely based on the experience of  European  immigrants at the beginning of the last century. Expects that immigrants usually start out from humble  beginnings in a new country and gradually move up the occupational/social ladders as they accumulate  more working experience, learn the language, and expand their social networks. Eventually, immigrants  reach the same level of economic achievement as the native born population.  o However, this theory doesn’t seem to apply for recent immigrants now • Why?  o A persistence of lower earnings for immigrants in comparison to the Canadian born is found even  when these immigrants have been in the country for a long period of time • Differences in economic achievements b/w immigrant and Canadian born populations: o Social networks of immigrants are usually less extensive than those of the Canadian born  Could affect the job search results o Foreign credentials ands foreign working experience of immigrants are discredited o There is differential treatment of immigrants in the labour market in relation to job attainment and  promotion • Also, economic attainments of RECENT immigrants are disproportionately lower than those of EARLIER  immigrants  • Growing divergence of economic integration among immigrants:: o Immigrants with skills and education are sought in the labour market; experience and expertise are  well rewarded o Immigrants with limited skills and education may have difficulty securing job opportunities  • Globalization creates a strong job surge in the banking, financial, business sectors. But manufacturing jobs  have been moved out of Canada to developing countries that offer lower labour costs  Racial and Ethnic Residential Patterns • Why is it important?  o Living in a very poor neighbourhood may adversely affect job search process, constrain job  networks, limit exposure to positive role models  o If some groups disproportionately reside in neighbourhoods with less desirable environments, their  full integration into society and their ability to share resources can be affected • Residential segregation: The tendency for groups (social classes/ethnic groups) to live in different  neighbourhoods to a greater extent than would be expected by chance alone. There are both voluntary ad  involuntary forms of residential segregation  o Individuals with high level of French language retention were associated with higher levels of  residential segregation Classical Perspectives that try to explain changes in immigrant settlement patterns • Macro: Concentric Zone Model (Burgess) o The general settlement patterns of immigrants at the city level SOC205 Week 8 o When immigrants arrive in a new country with limited resources and language skills, they usually  stay close to other members of their ethnic group. Residential group facilitates information sharing,  including job assistance, among ethnic friends.  o Since their residents have limited financial resources, these immigrant neighbourhoods are usually  located in the ‘zone in transition’ = ‘deteriorating area’ with low land values adjacent to the city  business centre  o When they have enough money, move into the ‘zone of workingmen’s homes’  ▯better amenities but  higher housing costs •
More Less

Related notes for SOC205H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit